profane

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profane

1. not designed or used for religious purposes; secular
2. not initiated into the inner mysteries or sacred rites
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

profane

see SACRED AND PROFANE.
Collins Dictionary of Sociology, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2000
References in periodicals archive ?
This desire is for a vital or higher existence that may offer a contrast to the profaneness of a soul-numbing finitude.
On the page following the rhymes, there is a single sentence-in the smaller, more cramped, hand Tennyson used for his own thoughts-in which he seems to be reflecting upon what the copying-out of the rhymes has taught him-about the "folk" world and perhaps about himself: "how often in one mind" he writes, "co-exist extremes of profaneness and refinement." There may be a degree of (unacknowledged?) self-accusation here.
He certainly did not subscribe to the strictures of Jeremy Collier, the theatre critic and clergyman who published a pamphlet in 1698 entitled A Short View of the Immorality and Profaneness of the English Stage, the Introduction to which starts: The business of Plays is to recommend Virtue, and discountenance Vice; To shew the Uncertainty of Humane Greatness, the sudain Turns of Fate, and the Unhappy Conclusions of Violence and Injustice: 'Tis to expose the Singularities of Pride and Fancy, to make Folly and Falsehood contemptible, and to bring every Thing that is Ill Under Infamy, and Neglect.
(80.) Illustrative of an early "obscenity" law but with an ostensibly religious focus was Massachusetts's act "Against Immorality, Intemperance and Profaneness, and for Reformation of Manners," which criminalized publication of "any filthy, obscene, or prophane song, pamphlet, libel or mock-sermon [in] mimicking of preaching, or any other part of divine worship." Act of Mar.
found every Day that some Arguments grew less acceptable to him, and that the constant Conversation with Men of great Profaneness, whose Wit consisted in abusing Scripture, and in repeating and acting what the Preachers said in their Sermons, and turning it into Ridicule (a Faculty in which the Duke of Buckingham excelled), did much lessen the natural Esteem and Reverence He had for the Clergy; and inclined him to consider them as a Rank of Men that compounded a Religion for their own Advantage, and to serve their own Turns.
We cannot expect otherwise to prevail against the ignorance, atheism, profaneness, superstition, idolatry, lust that reigns in the nation than by a prudent, sober, pious, virtuous education of our daughters.
(77) Robinson undermined his Baptist opponent with the dismissive comments that Helwys "misinterprets words," "letteth loose his tongue into the most intemperate rage," "falls into one of his hot fits," "is utterly deceived," and "is guilty of gross ignorance and profaneness and contempt of the knowledge, judgment, zeal and graces of all other men." (78) He judged that both Smyth and "especially" Helwys labored under the common disease of all ignorant men." (79) The Separatists, including Robinson, argued the truth of their views and the error of other "false" positions with no less intensity and conviction than the Baptists argued their position.
The Presbyterian Church looked to the Scottish Parliament for support in areas such as the security of Presbyterian polity, national fasts, and education; suppression of popery; discipline for profaneness; and supplying vacant churches.
In Otto's analysis, the wrath of God (orge,) is the experience of the tremendum itself accompanied by a feeling of absolute "profaneness," resulting in a sense of self-pollution and defilement, "a direct reflex movement at the stimulation of the numinous" (Otto 18, 50-51).
Thus, John Savage warned in 1704 that "a deluge of atheism and profaneness, of faction and sedition has flown in under the shelter of it" on account of "the liberty as now-a-days stretch'd beyond the design of the toleration, of every man's serving Cod in his own way." (74) During the Church in Danger debates in 1705, the Archbishop of York moved "that provision might be made to oblige men to go to some church, or to some meeting, (75) while the Archdeacon of Bedford informed the Bishop of Lincoln in 1706 that "neglect of public worship under the shelter of the Toleration Act is too common." (76) A Gloucestershire incumbent wrote similarly to his diocesan in 1706, noting that "profanely or idly absenting from all religious worship ...
At some point before the summer of 1629, Endicott "caused that maypole to be cut down, and rebuked" the remnant of Morton's men "for their profaneness and admonished them to look there should be better walking." William Bradford, Of Plymouth Plantation, 1620-1647, ed.
found in appeasing the clamour of the people against the supposed profaneness, of changing the saints' days in the Calendar, and altering the time of all the immoveable feasts."