PROGENY

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progeny

[′präj·ə·nē]
(biology)
Offspring; descendants.

PROGENY

1961. Report generator for UNIVAX SS90.
References in periodicals archive ?
The steers were born between 2008 and 2012 and slaughtered at 24 months of age after the completion of corresponding (46th to 54th) Hanwoo progeny testing batches.
Traditional methods of progeny testing a bull, dating back over 60 years of artificial insemination, were the results of evaluating a bull's daughter group against other daughter groups from other bulls.
Progeny testing is used to identify sugarcane families with superior, stable performance at the first selection stage of the Louisiana Sugarcane Variety Development Program, USA (LSVDP).
This was underlined by junior agriculture minister Michael Jack, who was opening a new 16,000 [pounds] conference centre at the Genus progeny testing centre in Berkshire.
Heterozygous plants from the last generation were self pollinated, and homozygous tolerant and sensitive individuals were identified on the basis of progeny testing.
Progeny testing was conducted by testing 3 purebred progeny on field test and 30 crossbreds on station test for meat quality traits such as pH, meat color ([L.
However, he added, there was no awareness about choosing the best bulls for breed improvement and absence of progeny testing which was leading to low productivity of dairy animals.
Besides, this, the Board has also registered and trained 566 quality breeders and registered 1004 Progeny Testing program Farmers.
For the past 12 years David has been responsible for managing and the progeny testing of 150 bulls used on 45 cubicle housed herds, each with an average of 1,000 Holstein cows - milked three times each day - across the eastern states.
Dairy bulls with the highest predicted transmitting ability are sought for breeding, but today's progeny testing is a laborious and time-consuming task, and evaluation of the data is costly in time and money.
A programme of progeny testing was carried out, mainly inspired by WD Griffiths, its county livestock officer, and Bangor University's Gwynne Williams, a leading authority on sheep breeding.