proglacial

proglacial

[prō′glā·shəl]
(geology)
Of streams, deposits, and other features, being immediately in front of or just beyond the outer limits of a glacier or ice sheet, and formed by or derived from glacier ice.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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Certainly, the latter presumption was fulfilled throughout the glacial phase in proglacial habitats.
Changes in tree growth at high elevations and changes in sediment delivery to proglacial lakes have also been used to infer climate and glacier fluctuations during the Holocene (Leonard, 1997; Luckman, 2000).
He used a Worden gravity meter to determine the thickness of the Greenland ice cap and also did gravity traverses over proglacial lake ice to determine lake depth.
For most of his life, he worked on preglacial river valleys in Ontario, and the origin and extent of proglacial precursors of the Great Lakes.
Apparently the coarser sands were carried into a proglacial lake or pond which covered the Heisler locality during periods of melting; these formed the sandy bands.
The pattern of retreat after that time is not well known, but analyses of sediment cores from a proglacial lake northwest of the ice cap suggest that the ice cap retreated from its northwest margin during the early Holocene because of regional warming, then re-advanced after the mid-Holocene climatic optimum (Lamoureux et al., 2002).
A notable example is in the southern parts of the Hudson and James Bay basins, where proglacial lake and seabed deposits have contributed to development of one of largest peatland complexes in the world.
Such a sequence has been interpreted to be caused by ice overriding, grounding, and then incorporating proglacial lake sediments of an ancestral Lake Erie (R.
The terminal area of Kaskawulsh Glacier comprises an extensive zone of stagnant glacier ice (Johnson, 1992), ice-cored drift, moraine ridges, and coarse proglacial outwash.