prograde orbit

prograde orbit

[¦prō′grād ′ȯr·bət]
(astronomy)
Orbital motion in the usual direction of celestial bodies within a given system; specifically, of a satellite, motion in the direction of rotation of the primary. Also known as prograde motion.
References in periodicals archive ?
Most objects in our solar system circle the sun in what's known as a prograde orbit, wherein their motion is counter-clockwise when seen from "above.
Since these asteroids are present in stable points, and since they are locked in prograde orbits, they do not (and will not) collide with the gas giant.
Close encounters with another planet or a companion star can yank a planet out of its circular, prograde orbit and into a highly eccentric and inclined orbit.
Table 1: Calculated period P (in hours) and predicted speed-change for prograde orbits [delta][v.
Conventionally, bodies orbiting in a direct sense, with orbital angular momentum vectors within 90deg of the direction of the Earth's orbital angular momentum (or the rotational angular momentum of the primary), are defined to have inclinations from 0deg to 90deg and are said to be on prograde orbits.
Matese and Whitman also note that meteoroids hitting comets in prograde orbits would produce only one-third the punch, on average.
Grun was puzzled and surprised by the finding, since most dust particles in the inner solar system have slower speeds and prograde orbits.