Prominence

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prominence

[′präm·ə·nəns]
(astrophysics)
A volume of luminous, predominantly hydrogen gas that appears on the sun above the chromosphere; occurs only in the region of horizontal magnetic fields because these fields support the prominences against solar gravity.

Prominence

 

a luminous formation of incandescent gases visible at the edge of the solar disk. When viewed against the background of the solar disk, prominences appear as dark filaments.

References in classic literature ?
She was a formidable style of lady with spectacles, a prominent nose, and a loud voice, who had the effect of wanting a great deal of room.
In the discussion from day to day of the various features of this programme, the question came up as to the advisability of putting a member of the Negro race on for one of the opening addresses, since the Negroes had been asked to take such a prominent part in the Exposition.
It was a large picture, set in a beautiful gold frame, and it hung in a prominent place upon a wall of Ozma's private room.
Well, your most prominent figure seems to be a figure of wood; so I must beg you to restrain an imagination which, having no brains, you have no right to exercise," suggested the Scarecrow, warningly.
We are arranging for the publication of the story in several prominent Canadian newspapers, and we also intend to have it printed in pamphlet form for distribution among our patrons.
This lump never went away, and it was prominent enough to be seen at a distance.
HAVING been summoned to serve as a juror, a Prominent Citizen sent a physician's certificate stating that he was afflicted with softening of the brain.
At its close he had settled in Franklin, and in time became, I had reason to think, somewhat prominent as a lawyer.
Thus, when we find that in the "Returns" all the prominent Greek heroes except Odysseus are accounted for, we are forced to believe that the author of this poem knew the "Odyssey" and judged it unnecessary to deal in full with that hero's adventures.
Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894), the first of the rather prominent group of recent Scotch writers of fiction, is as different as possible from Hardy.
The last ingredient played a very prominent part in the salad; stale eggs and roasted cocks'-combs furnished the grand dish of the repast; the wine even was not without a disgusting taste--it was like a medicinal draught.
His forehead was prominent, his chin and cheeks clean shaven.