promoter


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promoter

1. Chem a substance added in small amounts to a catalyst to increase its activity
2. Genetics a sequence of nucleotides, associated with a structural gene, that must bind with messenger RNA polymerase before transcription can proceed
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Promoter

 

a substance added to a catalyst in order to increase its activity, selectivity, or stability. A promoted catalyst is usually a catalyst containing a small amount of a promoter that by itself is catalytically inactive or only slightly active. In the case where the promoter is not inactive, the addition creates a mixed catalyst. Often an additive, given certain external conditions, concentrations, and methods of addition, acts as a promoter, whereas under different conditions the same additive serves as a catalyst poison. Most commercial catalysts belong to the promoted category. For example, V2Os, the catalyst which speeds up the oxidation of SO2 into SO3, is promoted by the oxides of alkali metals; metallic Fe, which catalyzes the synthesis of ammonia, is promoted by the oxides of aluminum, calcium, potassium, and other metals. The mechanism involved in the activity of promoters is explained by modern theories of catalysis.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

promoter

[prə′mōd·ər]
(chemistry)
A chemical which itself is a feeble catalyst, but greatly increases the activity of a given catalyst.
(genetics)
The site on deoxyribonucleic acid to which ribonucleic acid polymerase binds preparatory to initiating transcription of a gene or an operon.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

catalyst

1. A substance which accelerates a chemical reaction but appears to remain unchanged itself.
2. A hardener that accelerates cure of adhesives either with or without heat. Used primarily with synthetic resins.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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Evaluations of the public health impact of health promoters have identified specific benefits for the populations they serve, as well as challenges and limitations.
Validation of novel promoter sequences derived from two endogenous ubiquitin genes in transgenic Aedes aegypti .
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1 night's accommodation for four at a hotel (3* or above) chosen by the Promoter (two twin or double rooms - subject to availability), including breakfast, on 9th June 2019
A large number of India Inc promoters has been forced to draw loans by pledging their holdings in the company and keep their entities afloat.
Tiwa however stated that the behaviour of the promoters will not stop her from loving Kenya, 'I love Kenya, always have and always will,' she declared.
The promoter doesn't just put the show on, we do a lot more.
Summary: Shares pledged by promoters touched a 13-quarter high at the end of December.
"The global adhesion promoters market is projected to grow at a CAGR of 6.4% between 2016 and 2021"
The putative promoter of CbCOR15 contains cis-acting elements that have been shown to mediate expression of cold-responsive genes of Arabidopsis thaliana.