prompter

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prompter

a person offstage who reminds the actors of forgotten lines or cues
References in classic literature ?
Maria, she also thought, acted well, too well; and after the first rehearsal or two, Fanny began to be their only audience; and sometimes as prompter, sometimes as spectator, was often very useful.
As to his ever making anything tolerable of them, nobody had the smallest idea of that except his mother; she, indeed, regretted that his part was not more considerable, and deferred coming over to Mansfield till they were forward enough in their rehearsal to comprehend all his scenes; but the others aspired at nothing beyond his remembering the catchword, and the first line of his speech, and being able to follow the prompter through the rest.
Going through Aldersgate Street, there was a pretty little child who had been at a dancing- school, and was going home, all alone; and my prompter, like a true devil, set me upon this innocent creature.
And that you undertook to do what you might have done by this time, if you had made a prompter use of circumstances,' snarled Lammle.
At that critical moment he took counsel with himself, with better and prompter reasoning than one would have expected from so badly organized a brain.
Tom sailed along pretty well for three lines; and Maggie was beginning to forget her office of prompter in speculating as to what
Total quantity or scope: Central Bedfordshire Council are looking to create a framework of both prompters and developers who can assist the Council in extracting and maximising value from its assets, whilst also recognising the ability to promote regeneration where other criteria such as job creation are important.
A brand new app called iAutocue and a folding hood for portability of its Professional and Master series prompters will also be launched at the same time.
The California attorney's office said in a statement that the suspects are alleged to have bought shares in publicly traded business then pumped up the share price with "slick market campaigns, slick press releases, payments to stock prompters and cross trading," which involved buying and selling shares amongst themselves.