prop root


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Related to prop root: stilt root

prop root

[′präp ‚rüt]
(botany)
A root that serves to support or brace the plant. Also known as brace root.
References in periodicals archive ?
The aerating prop roots of the mangrove plant (Rhizophora racemosa) above the ground or especially above water with its rich production of exudates, death and decay, are extensively interwoven in close physical proximity to the negatively orthogravitropic pneumatophores of Avicennia sp supplying air through the soft, spongy tissue to the roots and microorganisms in the anoxic region of the mud.
cystophora medusae can readily be found during the day at the mangrove edge, in between the prop roots in the top 20 cm of the water column.
Adventitious roots include roots developing at stem nodes as well as prop roots, which help support the stem.
2001), on oyster reefs (Hoese 1960, Ortega 1981), and on mangrove prop roots (Marquez & Jimenez 2002).
mangle with subtidal prop roots occur on both windward (northeastern) and leeward (southwestern) shores of these cays.
Two other noteworthy findings were the occurrence of 10 isopod species in a relatively small area (250 square meters), and that three species coexist in the prop roots of the red mangrove, Rhizophora mangle.
In this study we show the first results of the taxonomic survey of diatoms found on red mangrove (Rhizophora mangle L.) prop roots in order to determine which diatom species may determine the structure of the epiphytic assemblage on mangrove prop roots.
Their wakes rock the canoe and barrel down the bay like miniature tsunamis, breaking against the mangroves, flushing out the muck trapped in prop roots encrusted with barnacles.
They are easily discernible by their prop roots that extend from the plant down into the substrate or soil.
Tidal current flows freely among the prop roots. Barnacles, oysters, sponges, and algae colonize the structure, forming colorful, living hallways through which snails and crabs carry on their business of consuming leaves which fall from above.
Red mangroves (Rhizophora mangle) grow best just above the mean high tide line, suspended on radiating, stilt-like "prop roots." Black mangroves (Avicennia germinans) typically grow a few feet farther from the water's edge, surrounded by hundreds of cigar-like "breathing tubes" called pneumatophores.
The prey will forage near the edge as they can quickly attempt to hide in shallower water, in the seagrass or among the mangrove prop roots. Yet for a predator, it is easier to spot and capture prey over open bottom adjacent to that edge.