propagation rate

propagation rate

[‚präp·ə′gā·shən ‚rāt]
(chemistry)
The speed at which a flame front progresses through the body of a flammable fuel-oxidizer mixture, such as gas and air.
References in periodicals archive ?
When tested in the tear analyzer, NR is shown to have very low crack propagation rates (figure 2), but heat aging dramatically worsens the crack propagation rate of NR, making it similar to ultra-EPDM.
By the above referred methodises the crack is stopped until crack propagation rate decreases up to 10-10 m/cycle [8, 9].
the number of clam juveniles attaining this stage divided by the number of all the clam individuals; termed the zooxanthellal propagation rate in our study).
Compared with spore collection and cutting, gemmae have the advantages of being abundant, high propagation rate and fast growth.
Chemically synthesized antioxidants have been added to foods to delay the onset of oxidation or to slow the propagation rate.
The width and propagation rate of the longitudinal cracks were determined by means of dial gauges of 100 mm and 50 mm gauge lengths and with 0,001 mm division value (Fig 5).
It should also be noted that there is no direct relation between rate of spread and flame intensity, because there are fuel types that present high propagation rate with low flame intensity, and vice versa.
While this had a relatively low propagation rate, it introduced a pluggable architecture, which means that any hacker can simply plug in new exploits," Rouland says.
The propagation rate was measured as the slope of the propagation phase during formation of conjugated dimes (33, 34).
Although direct current measurements indicate velocities of tens of centimeters per second, the actual average propagation rate of tracers down the western boundary is only one or two centimeters per second.
Correlation Between Crack Propagation Rate and Cure Process of Epoxy Resins