proper

(redirected from properly)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Idioms.

proper

1. Maths logic (of a relation) distinguished from a weaker relation by excluding the case where the relata are identical. For example, every set is a subset of itself, but a proper subset must exclude at least one member of the containing set
2. the parts of the Mass that vary according to the particular day or feast on which the Mass is celebrated
References in classic literature ?
The regulation of commerce with the Indian tribes is very properly unfettered from two limitations in the articles of Confederation, which render the provision obscure and contradictory.
After properly thanking my neighbor for these useful explanations, we naturally fell into discourse about matters and things in general, the weather in America being uniformly too fine to admit of discussion.
An hour or two later, I was removed from the line, properly ironed, and returned to my boss.
Think how nice it will be to go and live with people who will take care of you properly, and be fond of you.
At that moment the master himself entered, and having had to complain that his oxen had not been properly fed, he went up to their racks and cried out: "Why is there such a scarcity of fodder?
The red rooster has often said that my cluck and my cackle were quite perfect; and now it's a comfort to know I am talking properly.
I never feel like having my morning cackle till the egg is properly laid, and without the chance to cackle I would not be happy.
2) Euboea properly means the `Island of fine Cattle (or Cows)'.
If it properly accomplishes this main purpose, when the reader finishes it he should feel that his understanding of life and of people has been increased and broadened.
She always attends to her own serious business herself, as then she is sure of having it done properly.
Though we have properly enough entitled this our work, a history, and not a life; nor an apology for a life, as is more in fashion; yet we intend in it rather to pursue the method of those writers, who profess to disclose the revolutions of countries, than to imitate the painful and voluminous historian, who, to preserve the regularity of his series, thinks himself obliged to fill up as much paper with the detail of months and years in which nothing remarkable happened, as he employs upon those notable aeras when the greatest scenes have been transacted on the human stage.
I can introduce him to Anna, he looks at it properly.