prophecy

(redirected from prophecies)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.

prophecy

1. 
a. a message of divine truth revealing God's will
b. the act of uttering such a message
2. the function, activity, or charismatic endowment of a prophet or prophets

Prophecy; Prophesy

(religion, spiritualism, and occult)

A prophecy is a divinely inspired utterance that foretells events in the future events. The verb differentiation, to prophesy, did not emerge until c.1700. Today, to prophesy is to speak by divine inspiration, or in the name of a deity.

A prophet is regarded as the mouthpiece of deity. He or she does not question deity but, rather, prepares for divine inspiration, making himor herself receptive by prayer and/or fasting.

Prophecy

See also Omen.
Prosperity (See SUCCESS.)
Ancaeus
prophecy that he would not live to taste the wine from his vineyards is fulfilled. [Gk. Myth.: Brewer Dictionary, 32]
augurs
Roman officials who interpreted omens. [Rom. Hist.: Parrinder, 34]
Balaam
vaticinally speaks with Jehovah’s voice. [O.T.: Numbers 23:8–10; 24:18–24]
banshee
Irish spirit who foretells death. [Irish Folklore: Briggs, 14–16]
Belshazzar’s Feast
disembodied hand foretells Belshazzar’s death. [O.T.: Daniel 5]
Brave New World
picture of world’s condition 600 years from now. [Br. Lit.: Brave New World]
Calamity Jane
(Martha Jane Canary or Martha Burke, 1852–1903) mannish prophetess of doom. [Am. Hist.: Flexner, 71]
Calchas
declares that Iphigenia must be sacrificed to appease Artemis and ensure the Greeks’ safe passage to Troy. [Gk. Myth.: Hamilton, 261]
Calpurnia
sees bloody statue of Julius in dream. [Br. Lit.: Julius Caesar]
Carmen
the cards repeatedly spell her death. [Fr. Opera: Bizet, Carmen, Westerman, 189–190]
Cassandra
always accurate but fated to be disbelieved, predicts doom of Troy to brother, Hector. [Br. Lit.: Troilus and Cressida; Gk. Myth.: Parrinder, 57]
Cumaean
sibyl to discover future, leads Aeneas to Hades. [Gk. Lit.: Aeneid]
Delphi
ancient oracular center near Mt. Parnassus. [Gk. Myth.: Parrinder, 74; Jobes, 428]
Dodona
oldest oracle of Zeus in Greece. [Gk. Myth.: Kravitz, 83]
Ezekiel
priest and prophet to the Jews during Babylonian captivity. [O.T.: Ezekiel]
Golden Cockerel
its crowing predicts either peace or disaster. [Russ. Opera: Rimsky-Korsakov, Coq d’Or, Westerman, 392]
Guardian Black Dog
sinister omen of death. [Br. Folklore: Briggs, 207–208]
haruspices
ancient Etruscan seers who divined the future from the entrails of animals. [Rom. Hist.: EB, IV: 933]
Huldah
tells of impending disaster for the idolatrous. [O.T.: II Kings 22:14–19]
I Ching
a book of divination and speculations. [Chinese Lit.: I Ching]
Isaiah
foretells fall of Jerusalem; prophet of doom. [O.T.: Isaiah]
Jeremiah
the Lord’s herald. [O.T.: Jeremiah]
John
the Baptist foretells the coming of Jesus. [N.T.: Luke 3:16]
Joseph
predicted famine from Pharaoh’s dreams. [O.T.: Genesis 41:25–36]
Mopsus
seer who interpreted the words of the Argo’s talking prow. [Gk. Myth.: Benét, 684]
Muhammad
(570–632) the prophet of Islam. [Islam. Hist.: NCE, 1854]
Nostradamus
(1503–1566) startlingly accurate French astrologer and physician. [Fr. Hist.: NCE, 1969]
pythoness
priestess of Apollo, the Delphic Oracle, endowed with prophetic powers. [Gk. Hist.: Collier’s, VII, 682]
Rocking-Horse Winner, The
a small boy predicts winners in horse races through the medium of a demonic rocking horse. [Br. Lit.: D. H. Lawrence The Rocking-Horse Winner in Benét, 866]
Sibyllae
women endowed with prophetic powers who interceded with gods for men. [Gk. Myth.: Zimmerman, 239]
Sibylline Books
nine tomes foretelling Rome’s future. [Rom. Leg.: Brewer Dictionary]
Smith, Joseph Mormon
prophet; professed visions of new faith. [Am. Hist.: Jameson, 467]
Smith, Valentine Michael
messianic Martian shows earthlings the way. [Am. Lit.: Stranger in a Strange Land]
sortes
(Homericae, Virgilianae, Biblicae) fortune-telling by taking random passages from a book (as Iliad, Aeneid, or the Bible). [Eur. Culture: Collier’s, VII, 683]
Sosostris, Madame
“the wisest woman in Europe,” cleverly interprets the Tarot cards. [Br. Poetry: T. S. Eliot “The Waste Land”]
Tarot
cards used to tell fortunes. [Magic: Brewer Dictionary, 1063]
Tiresias
blind and greatest of all mythological prophets. [Gk. Myth.: Zimmerman, 255; Gk. Lit.: Antigone; Odyssey; Oedipus Tyrannus]
Ulrica
foretells Gustavus’ murder by his friend Anckarstrom. [Ital. Opera: Verdi, Masked Ball, Westerman, 313–315]
voice … crying in the wilderness
John the Baptist, in reference to his prophecy of the coming of Christ. [N.T.: Matthew 3:3]
Weird Sisters
three witches who set Macbeth agog with prophecies of kingship. [Br. Lit.: Macbeth]
References in periodicals archive ?
He said: 'I cannot say whether the prophecies are true or false; it is the prophet who is claiming and could be true or false, but if you come across such revelation how you do treat it?
The great mystery of prophecies is not just the perfect accuracy of the predictions but their relevance not just for a particular generation but for all times.
Chapter 2 focuses on Galfridian prophecies and their relationship with contemporary Scottish and Welsh prophetic literature.
His book titled Les Propheties (The Prophecies), received a mixed reaction when it was published.
Based on presentations from the colloquium, oMessianism, Millenarism, and Prophecy in the Iberian World, Fifteenth to Eighteenth Centuries,o held in Sao Paulo, Brazil, in August 2012, which was associated with the project, oInterpretations and Readings of the Prophecies of the Five Kingdoms in the Seventeenth Century,o the 10 essays in this volume examine millenarian and messianic prophetic movements in the Spanish and Portuguese empires in the early modern period.
Proposing a more persuasive alternative, Antti Laato suggests that the prophecies in Kings teach that Davidic reign over all Israel is conditional on the kings' righteous behavior, but Davidic reign over Judah is unconditional.
The prophecies were all for the comfort of the ruler, except that Esarhaddon's rival was reported to have gotten a positive oracle from the god Nusku.
Critique: Exceptionally well written, organized and presented, "Prophecies and Providence: A Biblical Approach to Modern Jewish History" is enhanced with the inclusion of four appendices: The Purpose of Prayer; The Resurrection; Return of the Lost Tribes; The Three Oaths.
As I sit and think about it, aside from a bunch of Aztecs who no longer exist and had a very faulty calendar, most of the end-of-the-world prophecies come from the USA, where they believe in that sort of stuff, as well as the Devil's testicles being made out of chocolate.
It's both funny and sad at the same time as I realized two things: First, class prophecies are exaggerated stories of what we could be in the future; second, fantasy elements aside, class prophecies usually don't come true.
There are important examples of northern prophecies extant only in West Midland witnesses, for example, Thomas of Erceldoune's prophecy as it is found in British Library, Harley MS 2253 (ca.
I know from my own Irish family background that many Catholics take these prophecies very seriously.