proselyte

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Related to proselytes: Phrygia, calumniators

proselyte

a person newly converted to a religious faith or sect; a convert, esp a gentile converted to Judaism
References in periodicals archive ?
Moreover, IS intensively produced high-quality magazines, such as Dabiq (Harris, 2014), named after a mythical place in Syria that represents a promised land for IS proselytes.
Most of Paul's converts in Antioch, Iconium, Phillipi, Thessalonica, Corinth etc were not proselytes, but "those who fear God".
Nihan addresses an ideological expose of the connections between the former and Ezra-Nehemiah, focusing on the inclusion/exclusion of proselytes in the post-exilic community.
Rashi explains that it refers to proselytes (gerim), whereas Ibn Ezra, Meiri and Metzudat David see the term as applying to righteous gentiles (hasidei ummot ha-olam).
All those who are exhibiting and watching it have gone proselytes.
30) Berkovits maintains that Jewish law is clear in granting discretion to the rabbinic court in cases of would-be proselytes.
23) The word 'improfessi' would seem to imply that these cannot be full proselytes, as such people would 'literally become Jews', or so says Williams, and in any case a full conversion would surely include a willingness to profess to the faith.
17) From the Greek proselytes, through ecclesiastic Latin proselytes.
Furthermore, the community has always had abundant Aboriginal churches, under local lay leaders, for proselytes to go to.
Even in the first terse description of the "powerful negative" one finds reference to the "false prophets" of modernism and the "acrimonious modernist proselytes and zealots who still linger on in academic nooks and crannies" (pp.
Chapter 2 is titled "Christian Conversion in Antioch" and argues that conversion of proselytes and God-fearers was significant only at "the first point of contact between the new Christian option and the established Jewish community" (57).
But the author's depiction of Christian proselytes and their aggressive opportunism in converting newcomers, with a deluge of words that so often contrast with their deeds, can be downright disturbing, not only because of their effect on isolated, culture-shocked, economically vulnerable parents, but especially on their children.