prosopagnosia


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prosopagnosia

[‚präs·ō·pag′nōzh·yə]
(psychology)
The inability to recognize familiar faces.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Barry Wainwright has had prosopagnosia for as long as he can remember.
It is also worth highlighting here that the existence of a face specific module has been strongly corroborated by double dissociations found in agnostic patients that could not recognise objects but retained their ability to recognise faces (Moscovitch et al, 1997), and patients with prosopagnosia who could not identify familiar faces whilst still able to recognise objects (Bentin et al, 1999).
Mindick, an educator who has prosopagnosia, discusses the challenges of children with this facial recognition disorder and ways teachers, parents, caregivers, and child care professionals can help them navigate social situations.
This changed in 1984, when it was discovered that in prosopagnosia certain autonomic reactions to familiar faces are still intact (Bauer).
Those with pure prosopagnosia can recognize voices, can assign gender to faces, know the meaning of facial expressions, but cannot recognize familiar faces (Damasio, 1989).
Andrew Young discusses five types of neuropsychological impairments, such as blindsight (a condition in which the patient does not consciously see a stimulus) and prosopagnosia (a condition in which the patient fails in an overt manner to recognize familiar faces).
Prosopagnosia (difficulty in recognizing faces) is a relatively common connectivity disorder that has different causes.
Maybe that's because my husband has a likeness to Brad Pitt, or maybe I'm suffering from prosopagnosia - an inability to recognise faces - which my husband definitely suffers from and so, apparently, does Brad Pitt.
PITTSBURGH, May 22, 2013 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- In light of Brad Pitt's recent announcement attributing his poor memory to prosopagnosia, or face blindness, Carnegie Mellon University extends an invitation to the actor to have his brain imaged and examined by renowned neuroscientist, Marlene Behrmann.
Some people end up essentially blind to faces, a condition called prosopagnosia.
The findings may offer promise in understanding the cognitive disorder prosopagnosia, the inability to recognize faces, and could also help in constructing better face-recognition software for security.
As a result of the fall, she has prosopagnosia, which renders her incapable of recognising faces.