prostate

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prostate

a gland in male mammals that surrounds the neck of the bladder and urethra and secretes a liquid constituent of the semen

prostate

[′prä‚stāt]
(anatomy)
A glandular organ that surrounds the urethra at the neck of the urinary bladder in the male.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the meantime, should men with enlarged prostates try herbs?
Among the approximately 200,000 cases of actual prostate cancer detected each year, as many as 70,000 are slow-growing cancers unlikely to cause serious disease in the man's lifetime.
However, Lepor noted that even in men with very large prostates, Hytrin works better, and the benefits of Proscar are small.
The current blood test for prostate cancer measures levels of prostate-specific antigen (PSA).
2 Journal of the National Cancer Institute, also suggests that benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), an enlargement of the prostate in older men, isn't necessarily a precursor of cancer, as often feared.
If the swollen prostate gland presses against the urethra, the tube that carries urine from the bladder out the body, the simple act of urination can become hit-or-miss or painful.
Prostates enlarge as men age, squeezing the urethra and making it difficult to urinate.
For the study, they used prostate tissue samples collected by professor John McNeal, MD, who has examined more than 1,300 prostates removed by different urologists at Stanford in the last 20 years.
Prostate cancer afflicts some 50 to 70 percent of men in Western countries by age 70, and the incidence of the disease is on the rise.
It's not just older men who have prostate cancer cells.
SeedNet(TM), a freezing technique used to destroy the diseased prostate gland without damaging the surrounding healthy tissue, is the most feasible option to improve long-term survival in men who experience a recurrence of the disease.
More recently, however, scientists have begun to build a compelling case that genetic variation among populations may account for much, perhaps even most, of the difference in prostate cancer risk.