duct

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duct

1. any bodily passage, esp one conveying secretions or excretions
2. a narrow tubular cavity in plants, often containing resin or some other substance
3. a channel or pipe carrying electric cable or wires

Duct

A nonmetallic or metallic tube for housing wires or cables, may be underground or embedded in concrete floor slabs; a duct usually fabricated of metal, used to transfer air from one location to another.

duct

[dəkt]
(anatomy)
An enclosed tubular channel for conducting a glandular secretion or other body fluid.
(communications)
An enclosed runway for cables.
(geophysics)
The space between two air layers, or between an air layer and the earth's surface, in which microwave beams are trapped in ducting. Also known as radio duct; tropospheric duct.
(mechanical engineering)
A fluid flow passage which may range from a few inches in diameter to many feet in rectangular cross section, usually constructed of galvanized steel, aluminum, or copper, through which air flows in a ventilation system or to a compressor, supercharger, or other equipment at speeds ranging to thousands of feet per minute.

duct

1. ,See air duct.
2. In electric systems, a metallic or nonmetallic tube, (usually circular, oval, rectangular, or octagonal) for housing wires or cables; may be underground or embedded in concrete floor slabs.

duct

A thin-wall tube installed in aircraft air-conditioning and heating systems to carry heated or cooled air for distribution to various aircraft locations.
References in periodicals archive ?
Although both IDC-P and HGPIN comprise cytologically atypical cells within prostatic ducts and acini, the architectural and cytologic atypia of IDC-P is more severe.
3, 31, 32) Prostatic ductal adenocarcinoma can arise both in large periurethral and peripheral prostatic ducts.
A final mimicker of IDC-P is urothelial carcinoma involving prostatic ducts (Figure 2, D).
Additionally, greater nuclear pleomorphism, variably prominent nucleoli, increased mitotic activity, and stromal inflammation favor urothelial carcinoma involving prostatic ducts over IDC-P.
Regions of adenocarcinoma were also noted in periurethral prostatic ducts (H, arrowheads).
Because prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) glands also comprise cytologically atypical or malignant secretory cells within prostatic ducts and acini, the relationship between PIN and IDC-P was debated.
They noted that the presence of cancer cells within prostatic ducts and acini, or IDC-P, was almost never seen in the absence of invasive carcinoma, and the concomitant invasive component was usually high grade.
14) In these 2 studies, in addition to the presence of malignant epithelial cells filling large acini and prostatic ducts with preservation of basal cells, the diagnosis of IDC-P required the presence of (1) a solid or dense cribriform pattern (Figures 1 and 2, B and C), where punched-out, luminal spaces account for less than 50% of the central cellular mass; or (2) marked nuclear atypia, where the nuclei are at least 6 times larger than adjacent, benign nuclei (Figure 2, E); or (3) nonfocal comedonecrosis (Figure 2, D).
Both HGPIN and IDC-P represent the presence of cytologically atypical or malignant cells within prostatic ducts and acini, although the architectural and cytologic atypia is always more pronounced in IDC-P.
Urothelial carcinoma cells may fill and distend the lumen of the prostatic ducts, and central necrosis may occur, imparting a morphology similar to IDC-P.
Tumors invading directly from prostatic ducts colonized by carcinoma in situ are designated as at least pT2, regardless of depth or extent of invasion (ie, there is no pT1 category in that setting).
The pT1 designation should only be applied to superficial invasion arising from the urethral lining; invasion arising from the prostatic ducts is designated as at least pT2.