protagonist


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protagonist

the principal character in a play, story, etc.
References in periodicals archive ?
From there he mysteriously disappeared and the protagonist has spent his entire life searching for him.
Caucasia's story about two sisters, the protagonist Birdie, who is compelled to pass as white while living with her white, revolutionary mother, and Cole, who travels with her black father to Brazil and Berkeley, is a riveting read.
Such a reading of the metropolis as a mother city is readily applied to Il serpente, in regard to the psychological journey undertaken by its protagonist.
Okay," we say, "Let's start by taking nominations for protagonist.
The narrative technique persuades the general reader to agree with the idea of the protagonist being a witch who means harm to everyone.
Recy Dunn's debut novel, The Cinquefoil Connection's, principal protagonist, Jonathan McClendon, is caught in a deep web of deception and manipulation, when he sells his soul to the devil in exchange for his eventual rise to the Presidency of the United States.
She opens her second novel, Black Girl in Paris, with a list of the authors who gave the young Eden, her main protagonist, the impetus to move to what she perceives as her own Arcadian land, France: "James Baldwin, Langston Hughes, Richard Wright, Gabriel Garcia Marquez and Milan Kundera all had lived in Paris as if it had been part of their training for greatness" (1).
In the case of Joffo, Simons chooses mainly to explore the Occupation context of Un sac de billes and the Jewish identity of the autobiographical protagonist and its textual effects.
And again rather like a later Braudel for all her attempts to bring out the human element of this history and the interrelationship between environment and culture, this vision often seems to make the city (and its contacts with the broader world) the protagonist--a virtually biological protagonist in a kind of postmodern organic narrative where society and human agency have a tendency to slide back toward environment and space.
This overlap occurs because these modes are defined along different axes: whereas first- and third-person narrations (as well as Genette's categories of homo- and heterodiegesis) are defined along the axis of narrator, second-person narration is defined along the axis of narratee--more precisely, by the coincidence of narratee and protagonist.