Protestant


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Protestant

a. an adherent of Protestantism
b. (as modifier): the Protestant Church
References in classic literature ?
"In the Protestant cantons you never see such poverty and dirt and squalor as you do in this Catholic one; you never see the lanes and alleys flowing with foulness; you never see such wretched little sties of houses; you never see an inverted tin turnip on top of a church for a dome; and as for a church-bell, why, you never hear a church-bell at all."
I intimated as much; but he was ready, and said with surly discontent: "You ought to see them in the Protestant cantons."
You never see a speck of dirt on a Protestant glacier.
I even doubted if the Rhone glacier WAS in a Protestant canton; but I did not know, so I could not make anything by contradicting a man who would probably put me down at once with manufactured evidence.
Spaniards, Englishmen, and Italian malcontents, adventurers of all nations, and soldiers of fortune of every sect, flocked at the first summons under the standard of the Protestants, and organized themselves like a vast association, whose branches diverged freely over all parts of Europe.
It produced opposite alliances with foreign powers: of Berne, at the head of the Protestant association, with the United Provinces; and of Luzerne, at the head of the Catholic association, with France.
She has been brought up a Catholic: had she been born an Englishwoman, and reared a Protestant, might she not have added straight integrity to all her other excellences?
As the controversies proceeded, Wiclif was brought at last to formulate the principle, later to be basal in the whole Protestant movement, that the final source of religious authority is not the Church, but the Bible.
Piers himself became and continued an ideal for men who longed for a less selfish and brutal world, and a century and a half later the poem was still cherished by the Protestants for its exposure of the vices of the Church.
He never so much as asked me whether he was a Papist or Protestant, which was, indeed, what I was afraid of.
Whether their identity as Irish Americans was the result of continuous shared social memories and cultural traits or the result of choosing a symbolic ethnicity, (57) the Catholic and Protestant participants in this study who identified themselves as Irish American did compose a distinct group of people.