Prudery

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Prudery

Grundy, Mrs. Ashfields’
straitlaced neighbor whose propriety hinders them. [Br. Lit.: Speed the Plough]
nice
Nelly excessively modest or prudish woman. [Am. Usage: Misc.]
Quakers
pacifist religious sect, often associated with puritanical behavioral standards. [Am. Hist.: NCE, 1017]
Shakers
sect believing in virgin purity. [Christian Hist.: Brewer Note-book, 819]
Victorian
one reflecting an unshaken confidence in piety and temperance, as during Queen Victoria’s reign. [Am. and Br. Usage: Misc.]
References in periodicals archive ?
Instead, Clark, obviously trying to be a good sport and avoid being labelled a prude, laughed and said, "Better a MILF than a cougar.
I am interested to see if I am as big a prude as I now see myself.
Since it was first published in 1747-48, Samuel Richardson' (1689-1761) novel has been seen as a contest between a libertine and a prude.
DOPE of the day is Cameron for going to Africa a bit of a prude and returning as the world's biggest expert on women - or so he seems to think.
One needn't be a prude or a hide-bound academic traditionalist to roll one's eyes at the earnest assertions of porn studies champions.
Adams as an easily scandalized prude, but McCullough persuasively shows him to be another American archetype--an early workaholic striver, dismayed by the old world's tolerance of sloth and inequality.
Jacob will report directly to Dennis Prude, executive vice president of construction and technical services.
Held each spring at the Prude Ranch near Fort Davis (see the box on page 88), TSP offers amateur astronomers one of the best sites for probing the depths of the visible universe.
That led Toronto Star columnist Michelle Landsberg, an ardent feminist, to write a sarcastic article attacking the Attorney-General as a 19th-century Victorian prude.
In On the Genealogy of Morals, Uncle Friedrich makes short work of the question of one's personal "interest" in the art object: he mocks Kant as a ridiculous prude for claiming that the Beautiful affects us precisely because it doesn't affect us personally but appeals to our disinterest; he agrees with Stendhal, who saw in Beauty la promesse de bonheur, the satisfaction of selfish pleasures.
Pursued by the pretended prude Arsinoe, unable to accept the affection of the gentle and sincere Eliante, Alceste is in love with the sharp - tongued, vain coquette Celimene, epitome of all that he despises.
This conclusion is exactly the opposite of that drawn from the same evidence by Jonathan Prude in The Coming of Industrial Order: Town and Factory Life in Rural Massachusetts, 1810-1860 (1983).