Prudentia

Prudentia

(religion, spiritualism, and occult)

Prudentia, asteroid 474 (the 474th asteroid to be discovered, on February 13, 1901), is approximately 26 kilometers in diameter and has an orbital period of 3.8 years. Its name is a personification of the word prudence. In a natal chart, Prudentia’s location by sign and house indicates where and how one is most likely to be prudent. When afflicted by inharmonious aspects, Prudentia may show imprudence. If prominent in a chart (e.g., conjunct the Sun or the ascendant), it may signal an exceptionally prudent person.

Sources:

Kowal, Charles T. Asteroids: Their Nature and Utilization. Chichester, West Sussex, UK: Ellis Horwood Limited, 1988.
Room, Adrian. Dictionary of Astronomical Names. London: Routledge, 1988.
Schwartz, Jacob. Asteroid Name Encyclopedia. St. Paul, MN: Llewellyn Publications, 1995.
References in periodicals archive ?
(42.) Ibid.: "Non solum autem divitiis nobis assunt, sed amplius consilio, prudentia, patrocinio, autoritate.
Nostri maiores, prestantissimi viri, quanta prudentia quantaque diligentia.
In that section of his De natura deorum in which he argues the view that gods exist as animate beings, she is, moreover, closely associated with the virtue of prudentia (2.31.79):
She often appears in a pair with another Greek goddess Prudentia holding a mirror and a snake.
In his policy paper, Van Baal restored the Dutch concept of beleid to its original meaning: prudentia. That is, he primarily pleaded for great caution, for an awareness of contingency, and for the fact that if one did not know enough, one could not be certain of how to operate.
quod nisi cognatis membris contexta maneret machina et imposito pareret tota magistro ac tantum mundi regeret prudentia censum, non esset statio terris, non ambitus astris, 70 erraretque vagus mundus standove rigeret, nec sua dispositos servarent sidera cursus noxque alterna diem fugeret rursumque fugaret, non imbres alerent terras, non aethera venti nec pontus gravidas nubes nec flumina pontum 75 nec pelagus fontes, nec staret summa per omnis par semper partes aequo digesta parente, ut neque deficerent undae nec sideret orbis nec caelum iusto maiusve minusve volaret motus alit, non mutat opus.
"Prudence" comes from the Latin "prudentia," meaning sagacity or expertise.
(7) "I agree with Irwin (and Aristotle and Aquinas)--escreve Finnis--that the principles which are picked out by a philosophical ethics and which shape both that ethical theory and political/legal theory worthy of the name cannot be other than a reflectively self-aware and appropriately extended version of prudentia, of right-minded thinking about what to do with one's life including one's life as a citizen.
Por eso, toda labor humana--y si es poderosa, mucho mas--se ejerce en la esfera de la libertad; en ella, como en el mar, viven los genios, las sublimidades, los atrevimientos sagaces, la fortuna de los valientes, el bien obrar constante de los doctores: caelestis prudentia.
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