psalmody


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psalmody

1. the act of singing psalms or hymns
2. the art or practice of the setting to music or singing of psalms
References in periodicals archive ?
And so saying, he moved along the windlass, here and there using his leg very freely, while imperturbable Bildad kept leading off with his psalmody.
60) It is performative exegesis that inheres in one's practical [superficialis], literal [litteralis], and mystical [intellectualis] attention to psalmody.
It is a key text for local history of the area, for the usage and distribution of musical instruments, and for the study of country psalmody.
25) But inspiration and theology for the sorrow songs and freedom songs came from the Africans' bitter experiences with chattel slavery in North America, not from European-American hymnody or psalmody.
Miserere mei Deus (track 4) we have a chance to hear in solos and then in choral arrangement the extraordinarily effective parallel combination of these sliding melodics with the European psalmody.
1) Gunkel, on the other hand, doubted that prophets contributed directly to psalmody, arguing that free, spontaneous prophecy is incompatible with a fixed liturgical agenda.
Paul, Minnesota, plans not just psalmody but a whole weekly service of music around a house band that plays bluegrass, country, and classic American hymns with equal stylistic integrity.
And in addition to an education in literature and history, they would have absorbed the music of hymns, from the plainchant of the early Church, through the German chorale tradition and the Georgian psalmody of the eighteenth century, to the lush harmonies of John Bacchus Dykes and the grandeur of Samuel Sebastian Wesley.
But, surely, little could prepare him for this peculiar piece of psalmody.
This personal devotional contains prayers, including ones for the beginning of a journey and safer return home, Scripture readings, and psalmody chosen with the traveler in mind.
Metrical psalmody continued to form the backbone of congregational singing in most Baptist churches in America until after the Revolutionary War.
In The Circus of the Sun, he made a psalmody of jugglers, acrobats and clowns, a book of praises for folk whose every action shows the form of praise.