Psalter

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Psalter:

see PsalmsPsalms
or Psalter
, book of the Bible, a collection of 150 hymnic pieces. Since the last centuries B.C., this book has been the chief hymnal of Jews, and subsequently, of Christians.
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Psalter

1. another name for Psalms esp in the version in the Book of Common Prayer
2. a translation, musical, or metrical version of the Psalms
3. a devotional or liturgical book containing a version of Psalms, often with a musical setting
References in periodicals archive ?
Toswell's concluding chapter looks at the Anglo-Saxon elements in a group of Anglo-Norman psalters, to show that the Old English glossing tradition continued after the Norman invasion, and that psalter production continued to be an important element of monastic literary life.
7) Reading or singing the psalter, in contrast, provides the faithful with knowledge, instructs them in virtue, removes sin, and - most importantly--elicits the grace of God.
The two Psalters are parts of the Early and the Late Wycliffite Bibles produced in England in the late 14th century and are frequently considered a text and its revision respectively rather than two independent translations (e.
Both of these psalters, I think, were designed with study in mind--an activity that was central to the devout life especially of medieval monks, who were attuned to the Christological readings of the Psalms that O'Briain emphasizes (19).
The prophetic tone and the clear analogy to the postbiblical morality of the modern world demonstrate that Psalter is not simply the Bible rhymed but a work with direct contemporary applications and implicit references to the present day.
Picturing Kingship: History and Painting in the Psalter of Saint Louis.
This includes prose versions of the psalms, commentaries on them, and--of special interest--substantial echoes of the psalter in such larger works as Shakespeare's Richard II and Hamlet, Spenser's The Ruins of Time, and Milton's Paradise Lost.
A spokesman for the Psalters Institute said it was "an achievement of which he could be truly proud".
This medieval gem, which has been named the Macclesfield Psalter, was previously unknown, having lain out of sight for hundreds of years until the cataloguers arrived to investigate the contents of the library shelves.
It was during a short-lived stint as a printer in Hartford, Connecticut, that he produced the psalter of 1785.
A valuable contribution by Elizabeth Peterson rehearses well-known iconographical sequences but, in tandem with close textual examination, interprets the immediate documentary context of the historiated initial in a group of early Gothic French psalters, demonstrating how certain iconographic particulars depend not on visual models but on textual ones, identifying some consequent figurative 'errors'.
Can the Howard and Harnhulle psalters be read for a contemporary perception of Zelo tui langueo/Reor nescia and its performance?