pseudoscientific

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pseudoscientific

Meaning "false knowledge," the term refers to theories that do not follow formal scientific discipline and that cannot be verified. In contrast, a "scientific" fact can be continuously proven with every experiment.
References in periodicals archive ?
Chapter 19 returns to paranormal pseudoscience and gives it some more excellent debunking.
But Gardner's theism didn't encompass miracles and one consequence of this was that he spent decades--since the 1952 publication of his groundbreaking book, Fads and Fallacies in the Name of Science--warring on pseudoscience and the hucksters and dupes who embraced it.
Moreover, Sokal is serious in claiming that all religions are pseudosciences, even though many (probably most) of them do not satisfy his criteria for being a pseudoscience (346-50).
From the "Climategate" scandal--which has exposed the nauseating hypocrisy and duplicity of a whole gang of climatologists manufacturing "science" to tit the agenda of UN-connected environmental extremists--to the embarrassing disclosure that data on allegedly vanishing Himalayan glaciers was almost completely fabricated, the pseudoscience is finally being laid bare to public scrutiny.
DINOSAURS AND PSEUDOSCIENCE (A QUESTION ABOUT THE K-T BOUNDARY).
The first such contribution is Mario Bunge's "The Philosophy Behind Pseudoscience.
A new teaching method is described for teaching research methods in an Introductory Psychology curriculum with the goals of making the section on research methods more interesting, providing an active learning environment for research methods and to allow students to examine scientifically the claims of pseudoscience.
If you're not blinded by the razzle-dazzle of their pseudoscience, you'll realise what you're actually looking at is a dehumidifier, commonly used to suck moisture out of damp walls.
In his last chapter, Sokal moves from pseudoscience to religion, and this is where the problems begin.
1) I presume that the water bottling industry misused the pseudoscience (2) of 'eight glasses a day' to develop a novel and unnecessary industry in much the way that the sports drink industry has misused science to assist the growth of the multi-billion dollar a year sports drink industry.
CRAP also sums up the pseudoscience triggered by today's risk-averse society, which attempts to derive alarming results from superficial risk assessments.
The bias is explicit: 'the pernicious stuff' of pseudoscience, the production of which is 'motivated by money and fame', misleads the public and 'corrupts the basis of factual knowledge'; as such, pseudoscience has to be debunked and extirpated (pp.