Pseudoscorpionida

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Pseudoscorpionida

[¦sü·dō‚skȯr·pē′än·ə·də]
(invertebrate zoology)
An order of terrestrial Arachnida having the general appearance of miniature scorpions without the postabdomen and sting.
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Vertical distribution and abundance of pseudoscorpion species (Arachnida) in the soil of a Neotropical secondary forest during the dry and the rainy season.
This may allow pseudoscorpion nymphs that have not yet matured to do so, and to be able to disperse among a new generation of passalids.
Invertebrates observed in these caves included crustaceans (16 species), pseudoscorpions (2 species), spiders (7), millipedes (8), a dipluran (1), psocopteran (1), collembolans (18), beetles (22), and flies (6).
When morphology misleads: interpopulation uniformity in sexual selection masks genetic divergence in harlequin beetle-riding pseudoscorpion populations.
This pseudoscorpion was described as Microcreagis ozarkensis by Hoff (1945) from specimens collected from Devil's Den State Park and Farmington, Washington County, Arkansas (Hoff 1945).
Pseudoscorpions were present in approximately equal numbers in burned and unburned areas.
L'araignee du Caverne Tooth, (Neoleptoneta myopica), le pseudoscorpion du Caverne Tooth (Tartarocreagris texana), et le coleoptere de terre du Caverne Tooth (Rhadine persophone) sont des invertebres en voie de disparition des formations de karst specifiques au Texas.
New records of pseudoscorpions (Arachnida: Pseudoscorpiones) from Chiapas, Mexico.
Biology of Cordylochernes scorpioides Cordylochernes scorpioides is the largest, most sexually dimorphic pseudoscorpion in the chernetid subfamily, Lamprochernetinae.
Before the new finds established the great antiquity of these animals, the pseudoscorpion fossil record went back only 35 million years.
First fossil record of the pseudoscorpion family Pseudochiridiidae (Arachnida, Chelonethi, Cheiridioidea) from Dominican amber.
As an example of treatment D, consider a species of pseudoscorpion that has five instars in its life history.