psilate

psilate

[′sī‚lāt]
(botany)
Lacking ornamentation; generally applied to pollen.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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Exine sculptures of 80% plant pollen were Reticulate while 20% had psilate pollens (Figure 4).
(2010) noted that the pollen grains found in the pollen pockets of 'Ponera ' minuta were psilate and oblate as those found in other modern Ficus species; and that, 'P'.
Far less amount is represented by the "cylindrical psilate" (8%) and "reflexed psilate" (10%).
A striking fact of the evolutionary order of these selected species was that pollen characters related to Dalbergia species were established as porate, and reticulate; those related to Cassia fistula which were psilate, perfolate, oblate-spheroidal to prolate-spheroidal or sub prolate.
The exine is largely unomamented externally (psilate to scabrate) and has two layers that are visible using light microscopy (LM).
Ornamentation: Reticulate, reticules medium and irregular, Colpus area and apocolpium are psilate or slightly reticulate.
Hohenbergia capitata also shares the same pollen morphology with many other species of Hohenbergia, in which the pollen grains are usually diporate or sometimes 3 to 6-porate, with exine often psilate, sharply contrasting with the typical pollen grains of the members of the "Gravisia complex", which are distinctly pantoporate, usually bearing over 8 pores distributed more or less regularly over the whole surface, with a broadly reticulate exine.
Ash pollen is distinguished from willow by the lack of a psilate furrow margin, present in willow pollen.
Palaeoenvironmental indicators of environmental change that might indicate early human occupation include microscopic charcoal particles, grass pollen, Pandanus pollen and four types of fern spores (Lycopodium cernuum, Gleichenia linearis, Psilate monolete, Psilate trilete).