psychoacoustics

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Psychoacoustics

All of the psychological interactions between humans (and animals) and the world of sound. It encompasses all studies of the perception of sound, as well as the production of speech. See Hearing (human), Speech

psychoacoustics

[‚sī·kō·ə′küs·tiks]
(psychology)
The study of the psychological interactions that take place between humans or animals and the world of sound, including studies of the perception of sound and studies of the production of speech.

psychoacoustics

The study of the human perception of sound. Psychoacoustics analyzes how the brain interprets the volume and frequencies of audio waves. See psychoacoustic model and perceptual audio coding.
References in periodicals archive ?
Generally, in a psychoacoustical JND experiment, the yielded JND value is obtained when d' = 1, where in an MAA experiment
Although, both BLB predictions yielded an oscillatory behavior, it seems that the SOC output obtained a better prediction in respect to psychoacoustical data.
The Institut was formed "in order to integrate the musical, theoretical and psychoacoustical research of bases as a scientific foundament [sic] into the education at the Hoch-schule 'Mozarteum.'" (7) Directed today by musicologist Prof.
However, Gabor had anticipated most of the relevant psychoacoustical notions discussed in Moles's Th[acute{e}]orie de l'Information et Perception Esth[acute{e}]tique (Paris: Flammarion, 1958).
Terhardt, "Pitch, Consonance, and Harmony," Journal of the Acoustical Society of America 55 (1974): 1061-1069; Richard Parncutt, Harmony: A Psychoacoustical Approach (Berlin: Springer-Verlag, 1989).
Most of the then-current psychoacoustical representations of musical pitch - including those of Helmholtz (1863), Mach (1906), and Koffka (1935)(16) - shared a general tendency to conceive of pitch as a one-dimensional attribute of sound.
This tendency left unsolved the psychoacoustical problem that any representation of pitch as one-dimensional does not account for the phenomenon of octave equivalence: and octaves, moreover, are only one of many musically useful relationships that stand out from this continuum.
"Revision of Terhardt's Psychoacoustical Model of the Root(s) of a Musical Chord." Music Perception 6:65--94.