psychobiology

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psychobiology

[¦sī·kō·bī′äl·ə·jē]
(psychology)
The school of psychiatry and psychology in which the individual is considered as the sum of his environment as well as being considered a physical organism.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
According to the researchers, there are in fact psychobiological markers of aggressive behaviour, in other words, there are variables of a psychobiological type that account for aggressive behaviour in children.
A psychobiological model of temperament and character.
Cloninger's psychobiological personality model (TCI) evaluates the responses of a person to novelty, danger and various types of reward with four basic personality dimensions.
Positive affect and psychobiological processes relevant to health.
Acute psychobiological responses of resistance training with different levels of social interaction.
Personality in the third dimension: A psychobiological approach.
Associations between success and failure in a face-to-face competition and psychobiological parameters in young women.
The inventory is based on Cloninger's psychobiological model for personality traits (Cloninger, 1987), according to which personality is made up of temperament and character.
Riemann D, Berger M, Voderholzer U, 2001, Sleep and depression--results from psychobiological studies: an overview.
Here, ethics, art, and politics afford truths that are held to be inferable from truths in science about our psychobiological nature with no naturalistic fallacy.
For example, a review that analyzed 70 studies on obesity and personality employing Cloninger's psychobiological model and the five factor (extraversion, neuroticism, agreeableness, conscientiousness, and openness to experience) model of personality (FFM) found that in obese subjects there is a predominance of the neuroticism dimension and impulsiveness with responses mediating eating restriction and "emotional eating" facing external signals.
Lynch 1945 said that certain cutaneous manifestations appear to be the evidence of psychobiological imbalance.