psychodynamics

(redirected from psychodynamic)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Wikipedia.

psychodynamics

[¦sī·kō·dī′nam·iks]
(psychology)
The study of human behavior from the point of view of motivation and drives, depending largely on the functional significance of emotion, and based on the assumption that an individual's total personality and reactions at any given time are the product of the interaction between his genetic constitution and his environment.
References in periodicals archive ?
This is particularly why neuroscience, psychodynamic and social learning theories complement each other in providing a much broader 'picture' when it comes to understanding criminal behaviour.
Long-term psychodynamic psychotherapy: a basic text.
The main associations were: psychoanalytic approach and items 5, 6, 16 and 24 moderately relevant, and item 18 irrelevant; psychodynamic approach and items 1, 2, 3 and 24 very relevant, and items 5, 16 and 22 moderately relevant; behavioral-cognitive approach and items 1, 3, 2, 24 very relevant; other approaches (gestalt therapy, psychodrama, transactional analysis, and systemic) and items 2, 4, 5, 6, 9, 16, 18, 22, 23 and 24 moderately relevant.
One renowned practitioner who calls for such an approach is Nancy McWilliams, whose books Psychoanalytic Diagnosis (McWilliams, 1994), Psychoanalytic Case Formulation (McWilliams, 1999), and Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy (McWilliams, 2004) are seminal texts in the modern psychodynamic field.
In fact, it usually produces results in 10 to 15 sessions, about half the time of psychodynamic therapies, according to studies.
Therapeutic Relationships with Offenders: An Introduction to the Psychodynamics of Forensic Mental Health Nursing Edited by Anne Aiyegbusi and Jennifer Clarke-Moore, Footprint Books, RRP 22.
Four studies were identified for play therapy, one for art therapy, two each for psychodynamic and pharmacologic therapy, and one for psychological debriefing (Am.
Psychodynamic therapy focuses on changing unconscious reactions to traumatic events.
The clinical framework underpinning this book will not satisfy everybody either; hard evidence for the effectiveness of psychodynamic approaches is difficult to construct and hard to come by.
Simply applying a private practice psychodynamic therapy model to children in the foster care system is not the solution.
Psychotherapy as Religion goes on to demonstrate how psychodynamic psychotherapy, behavioral therapy, and cognitive-behavioral therapy are all rooted in an American mythology that exalts "heroic individualism", placing responsibility squarely on the individual's shoulders and utterly ignoring contributing factors from society.
A consortium of psychoanalytic groups has published its own guide to the full spectrum of disorders after more than 2 years of preparation: It is titled the Psychodynamic Diagnostic Manual (PDM).