psychogenic


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psychogenic

Psychol (esp of disorders or symptoms) of mental, rather than organic, origin
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

psychogenic

[¦sī·kō¦jen·ik]
(medicine)
Of psychic origin.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
It has a strong history of use as a sexual tonic, particularly for men, despite the fact that in a randomized, single-blind trial, crude root powder 2 g tid was not superior to placebo at improving psychogenic ED in 86 men, The short duration of this trial of 60 days was probably a major limiting factor as adaptogens typically take more than three months to start to have noticeable effects.
Wilcoxon rank sum test was performed on parameters between psychogenic and organic ED; Kruskal-Wallis H -test was used in parameters with regard to etiological groups and age groups.
According to the patient's personal medical history, she had been diagnosed with psychogenic tremors, which were not accompanied by any neurological symptom.
Psychogenic seizures: clinical features and psychological analysis Epilepsy & Behavior, 4, 241-245.
There has been a previous report of CD manifesting as foot deformity with rigid psychogenic equinovarus in the absence of trauma [8].
PP is preferable over psychogenic polydipsia to describe compulsive water drinking unless there is a clear psychotic disturbance.
Camptocormia was considered a reaction to battlefield stress, "shell shock", a disorder which included other forms of psychogenic paralysis, tremor, mutism, and fugue states.
We think that central to this unfortunate situation is a series of complex variables, such as inadequate education about PNES during graduate school and the tendency of some professionals to minimize psychogenic and traumatic factors in their clinical case-loads.
Noncardiac etiologies can be neurologic, metabolic, drug-induced, or psychogenic. "This is where the detective work comes in."
Single blind clinical trial of psychotherapy for treatment of psychogenic movement disorders.
Two main types of acquired stuttering have been described: neurogenic and psychogenic. The latter is thought to be associated with a coinciding emotional stressor or a traumatic event, whereby a psychological stressor manifests as a somatic symptom.
BMS is frequently associated with stressful life events, anxiety, and depressive disorders [10, 14], and as these psychogenic factors can either enhance or reduce perception of pain (Figure 1), BMS can be managed by pharmacological or by psychological means or by a combination of the two [14, 15].