psychohistory

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psychohistory

the application of ‘psychoanalytic forms of understanding to the study of history’ (I. Craib, 1989). An exemplification of the approach is the work of E. Erikson (Life History and the Historical Moment, 1975).
Collins Dictionary of Sociology, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2000
References in periodicals archive ?
"Professor Peter Loewenberg is the premier psychohistorian who has been a pioneer and an activist in the field.
However, nicknames may not always be positive, as former Minor Leaguer turned psychohistorian Jack Fitzpatrick pointed out to me:
Strozier, the psychohistorian, believes it is possible that both were
As the psychohistorian Lloyd DeMause has written, "the history of childhood is a nightmare from which we have only recently begun to awaken."(89) Yet we cannot wake up until we are willing to open our eyes, allowing ourselves to see the many problems and the dreadful reality of childhood sexual abuse, whether in our own society, or in that of the ancient Greeks.
Asimov's main character, Hari Seldon, is a "psychohistorian" who forecasts his civilization's decline and devises a way to hasten its renewal.
Joel Kovel's work as psychiatrist, psychohistorian, and cultural critic has long been guided by this concern with human freedom and its impediments.
Seelye shuns the misty world of the psychohistorian and keeps his eye on geopolitical realities.
A psychohistorian based in New York, Gonen looks at the appearance and reappearance of some of the most prominent shared themes that conditioned Jewish expectations from history.
A psychohistorian might find this episode rooted in Operation Pedro Pan of 1960-62, when more than 14,000 mostly middle-class Cuban children were flown alone to Miami, many never seeing their parents again.
Foundation (1951), by Isaac Asimov: In this classic of science fiction, a "psychohistorian" uses computers and advanced mathematics to predict the decline and fall of the Galactic Empire, and launches a plan to shorten the coming dark ages.
A judicious use of psychohistory might have deepened the work - but an injudicious use would have ruined it, so we may be grateful for what we have before us, and every reader is free to be his or her own psychohistorian. The remarkable gallery of historical figures in the text, in any event, makes some of it read like a novel by Aldous Huxley come alive - or perhaps one by Upton Sinclair.
A psychohistorian might well trace his subsequent obsession with George Washington to the humiliating 1964 loss.