psychological warfare


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psychological warfare

the military application of psychology, esp to propaganda and attempts to influence the morale of enemy and friendly groups in time of war
References in periodicals archive ?
In February 1944, McClure, under General Dwight Eisenhower's command, established the Psychological Warfare Division, Supreme Headquarters, Allied Expeditionary Forces (PWD/SHAEF), for the invasion of France and prosecution of the war in mainland Europe.
We are face to face with a scenario of a psychological warfare against Turkish people.
In psychological warfare, "you make your enemy convinced of something he is not convinced of.
But psychological warfare was aimed not only at foreign, but also at domestic audiences, and some of the book's most interesting material deals with how Americans were both subjects of, and at times actors in, government propaganda campaigns.
Portraying a husband and wife who are accomplished at the art of psychological warfare, Bill Irwin shouldn't be able to fight, while Kathleen Turner shouldn't have a teardrop's worth of tenderness.
Eighteen such psychological warfare operations from 1605 to modern times are described, along with close inspections of the 'blackout' of key questions the traditional and alternative media alike have failed to address.
Other documents obtained by the paper describe the "Zarqawi PSY-OP"--the latter a term for psychological warfare operations--as "the most successful information campaign to date.
It is perhaps the finest work on psychological warfare in the Arabic language combining not only Arab, but German, Russian, British and American sources.
After joining the CIA in 1951, he later became chief of the Psychological Warfare branch of the CIA's station in Miami.
When the war broke out, he found himself working on government projects, most notably for the Psychological Warfare Branch, which sent him to North Africa in 1943 and then to Italy.
Still, it sounds more like a fraternity prank than a serious contribution to psychological warfare.
And one can imagine a disaffected spouse waging psychological warfare to push the other to file for divorce, or making false allegations of physical abuse or other "faults.