psychosurgery


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psychosurgery

[¦sī·kō′sər·jə·rē]
(medicine)
The branch of medicine that deals with the treatment of various psychoses, severe neuroses, and chronic painful conditions by means of operative procedures on the brain.
References in periodicals archive ?
While Pavlovian conditioning guided his own work, he tried experimental psychosurgery on animals.
In the palaces of France, the man best known for developing psychosurgery mingled with US President Woodrow Wilson, British Prime Minister David Lloyd George, China's extraordinary Wellington Koo and a young Ho Chi Minh from French Indochina (Lowis and Minagar 2003:286-291, Wiarda 1977: 1-54, 97, and Macmillan 2003:45, 57, 59, 331-334).
Testimony was heard on psychosurgery, the use of the poor and prisoners as research subjects, genetic engineering, the use of new surgical techniques, the sterilization of minors and the utilization of approved drugs in untested, unapproved therapies.
Various amendments concerning psychosurgery, confidentiality of records and the makeup of the proposed commission's membership were offered and accepted.
They claimed he had been saved by psychosurgery (lobotomy).
They appear to be safe and rapidly effective for some patients, and may be an alternative when OCD is intractable enough to make psychosurgery an option, Dr.
com include: no psychosurgery, no shock treatment, no "talk therapy," and minimal or no use of psychiatric drugs (on a temporary or emergency basis only).
Specifically, the court invalidated the Iona State hospital's use of psychosurgery without patients' informed consent, resting its decision in significant part on the principles of Nuremberg.
For example, shortly thereafter an article from a legal symposium on psychosurgery noted: "Kaimowitz is probably the most important opinion yet published regarding the law's attempt to cope with man's recently augmented power to control behavior.
Although there have been periodic attempts to use similar "ethics committees" to make decisions for individual patients (for example, psychosurgery committees), prospective decisionmaking by committee for individual patients has never held wide support either in the medical community or the public.
Protesters included delegations from France, Germany, the United Kingdom, Denmark, Sweden, Holland and America, and included victims of involuntary commitment, psychosurgery, electroshock and psychiatric drug abuse.
Ten years ago, psychosurgery, "gene surgery," and surgical sterilization received considerable attention in bioethics.