ptychopetalum


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muira puama

muira puama

Known as "potency wood" in Brazil. Root and bark used. Said to increase blood flow in the genitals of men and women. Bark are roots are the parts used medicinally as a tea. Overuse may result in anxiety, because it’s a stimulant. Plant grows to 15 ft (5m)
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Ptychopetalum olacoides, a traditional Amazonian "nerve tonic", possesses anticholinesterase activity.
INCI: Water/glycerin/caprylyl/capryl glucoside/pfaffia paniculata root extract/ ptychopetalum olacoides bark/stem ex-tract/lilium candidum flower extract
Antioxidant activities of Ptychopetalum olacoides ("muirapuama") in mice brain.
Olacaceae Ptychopetalum Onagraceae Lopezia Orchidaceae All Pedaliaceae (incl.
Conclusion: This study offers evidence of functional and neuroprotective effects of two weeks treatment with a Ptychopetalum olacoides extract against A[beta] peptide-induced neurotoxicity in mice.
INCI: Water and butylene glycol and PEG-40 hydrogenated castor oil and ptychopetalum olacoides extract and trichilia catigua extract and pfaffia sp extract
Promnesic, anti-amnesic and AChEI properties were identified in a standardized ethanol extract from Ptychopetalum olacoides (POEE), a medicinal plant favored by the elderly in Amazon communities.
INCI name: Water and butylene glycol and cichorium intybus (chicory) root extract and ptychopetalum olacoides bark/root extract
This study combined with the identified antioxidant and neuroprotective properties, as well as the claimed benefits associated with stressful periods suggest that Ptychopetalum olacoides (Marapuama) might possess adaptogen-like properties.
Clinical toxicology study of a herbal medicinal extract of Paullinia cupana, Trichilia catigua, Ptychopetalum olacoides and Zingiber officinale (Catuama) in healthy volunteers.
Ptychopetalum olacoides (PO) roots are used by Amazonian peoples to prepare traditional remedies for treating various central nervous system conditions in which free radicals are likely to be implicated.
Ptychopetalum olacoides, a traditional Amazonian nerve tonic possesses anticholinesterase activity.