public school


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public school,

in the United States, a tax-supported elementary or high school open to anyone. In England the term was originally applied to grammar schools endowed for the use of the lay public; however, it has come to be used for the famous endowed preparatory schools that now charge tuition. The English public schools include Charterhouse, Cheltenham, Clifton, Eton, Harrow, Rugby, Westminster, and Winchester. See schoolschool,
term commonly referring to institutions of pre-college formal education. It also properly includes colleges, universities, and many types of special training establishments (see adult education; colleges and universities; community college; vocational education).
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Bibliography

See also V. Ogilvie, The English Public School (1957).

Public School

 

a private and privileged secondary school in Great Britain preserving aristocratic traditions. Most public schools are boarding schools. The most famous are the nine “great” aristocratic public schools: Winchester (founded 1387), Eton (1441), Shrewsbury (1551), Westminster (1566), Rugby (1567), Harrow (1571), St. Paul’s (16th century), Merchant Taylors School (16th century), and Charterhouse (1609).

public school

1. (in England and Wales) a private independent fee-paying secondary school
2. (in the US) any school that is part of a free local educational system
References in classic literature ?
However, finding both father and son against her on this point, she gave in, like a wise woman, and proceeded to prepare Tom's kit for his launch into a public school.
Elinor would not oppose his opinion, because, whatever might be her general estimation of the advantage of a public school, she could not think of Edward's abode in Mr.
Torture in a public school is as much licensed as the knout in Russia.
An observer, accustomed to classify men, might have put him down as a canon of the church with a taste for lay costume and a country life, or as the master of a large public school, who joined his scholars in their outdoor sports.
Or at least this was true until he learned, several days subsequent to the tragedy, that his son Jack had not reported at the public school en route for which they had seen him safely ensconced in a railway carriage.
Yet there was nothing finicky about their politeness: it had the Public School touch, and, though sedulous, was virile.
He had been left an orphan when he was fresh from a public school.
Here is Bill Jukes, every inch of him tattooed, the same Bill Jukes who got six dozen on the WALRUS from Flint before he would drop the bag of moidores [Portuguese gold pieces]; and Cookson, said to be Black Murphy's brother (but this was never proved), and Gentleman Starkey, once an usher in a public school and still dainty in his ways of killing; and Skylights (Morgan's Skylights); and the Irish bo'sun Smee, an oddly genial man who stabbed, so to speak, without offence, and was the only Non-conformist in Hook's crew; and Noodler, whose hands were fixed on backwards; and Robt.
He had induced the legislature to establish the first public school for deaf-mutes, the school that drew Bell to Boston in 1871.
Any public school could send us fifty good men in your place, but it takes time, time, Porkiss, and money, and a certain amount of trouble, to make a Regiment.
All day he sat at a machine turning bolts; and then in the evening he went to the public school to study English and learn to read.
He had been eight years at a public school and had learnt, I understood, to make Latin verses of several sorts in the most admirable manner.

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