publican


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publican

[Lat.,=state employee], in ancient Rome, man who was employed by the state government under contract. As early as c.200 B.C. there was a class of men in Rome accustomed to undertaking contracts involving public works and tax collecting; the tax collectors made the most profit. The publicans were usually equitesequites
[Lat.,=horsemen], the original cavalry of the Roman army, chosen, according to legend, by Romulus from the three ancient Roman tribes; the equites were selected from the senatorial class on the basis of wealth.
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, or capitalists. In the Gospels—which showed the general detestation, particularly in Asia Minor, Syria, and Palestine, in which the publicans were held—the publicans mentioned were tax collectors. From the 1st cent. A.D. the abuses of the publicans began to be corrected, and by the end of the 2d cent. the publicans as a group had disappeared.
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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Publican

 

in ancient Rome, a person, usually an equite, who obtained state property—land, mines, saltworks—by bidding in order to exploit it. Publicans also obtained contracts for public construction or supply and the right to collect state taxes. In the case of major transactions, publican companies were established, which unrestrainedly exploited and ruined the population, especially in the provinces. From the time of the empire, beginning in the first century AD., publican activity was restricted, and tax collecting was transferred to state officials.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

publican

1. (in Britain) a person who keeps a public house
2. (in ancient Rome) a public contractor, esp one who farmed the taxes of a province
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Ms Humble said: "When there was an opportunity to take over the Lion & Lamb, I couldn't wait to speak with Ei Publican Partnerships.
Stuart Ireland, Ei Publican Partnerships's regional manager, said: "We're delighted Gillian has taken over the Lion & Lamb.
In a statement on the pub's website the publican, who has worked for top hotels including The Ritz in London, says: "It is with sadness that we have to announce that our landlords, Punch Taverns, will not be renewing our tenancy when it ends shortly.
PUBLICANS in an Irish village are closing on Good Friday despite the Republic's booze ban being lifted after 91 years.
A spokesperson from Ei Publican Partnerships said: "We can confirm that The Bell and Cross, Clent, is currently closed due to the publican's decision to cease trading.
But Martin Howe, QC, for the publican, insisted his inability to get hold of a "commercial" box was due to "anti-competitive" behaviour by the Premier League and Sky.
As a publican or licensee, duties include organising deliveries, making sure the bar area is stocked and well maintained, serving customers and running the bar in line with health and safety regulations.
Richard Dennis: would-be publican FORMER jockey Richard Dennis, who formed a great partnership with Migrator during his successful riding career, originally joined the yard in the 1980s but has been riding out at Pond House since September 1995.
Publican at the Black Boy Inn, Caernarfon, Gary Evans, 26, said: "I think it's a good thing.
"We test marketed this beer with four of the most discerning publicans in Chicago--the Hopleaf, Farmhouse, Telegraph Wine Bar, and the Publican.
Pubs have been forced to turn to food to maintain profits as the sale of beer continues to fall, says the trade magazine The Publican which quizzed nearly 1,000 licensees.