pull


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Acronyms, Idioms, Wikipedia.

pull

1. a period of rowing
2. a single stroke of an oar in rowing
3. the act of pulling the ball in golf, cricket, etc.
4. the act of checking or reining in a horse

What does it mean when you dream about pulling?

Pulling in a dream can be a direct reflection of exerting effort in one’s waking life. If we dream about being pulled, it represents our sense of being influenced, of being “pulled” in a certain direction. The dream might also be drawing on a idiomatic sense of pull, as in “pulling strings,” to “have pull,” to “pull something off,” to “pull together,” or to “pull rank.”

pull

A handle for opening a door, window, drawer, etc.

pull

References in periodicals archive ?
They tell me the pull doesn't slow them down at all for fast close-range shots, yet gives the option of a crisp pull when a precision shot is required.
For example, a dog pulling a sled must pull 3 times his body weight; a dog on rails must pull 10 times his body weight; and a dog pulling a cart must pull 8 times his body weight.
Initially, the plan was to pull the Range Rover along the beach, but after a quick call from her instructor, Elham decided it was best to pull it along the asphalt so as to avoid any injuries before her trek.
The sharper the bend, the harder it was to pull the tape off--more energy went into tearing and smaller bits of tape came off.
It is the purpose of this article to examine retail sales pull factors for the cities and towns of South Dakota.
Of the 314 participants who responded to the question "Do you recurrently pull out your hair (scalp, facial, pubic, other) so that there is noticeable loss, such as bare patches or thin hair?
The holes, created by the collapse of stars, exert a massive I gravitational pull on nearby matter.
The holes, which are created by the collapse of giant stars, exert a huge gravitational pull on any matter nearby.
A new feeding mechanism keeps operators away from pull rolls on thread-up and makes a safer, more compact film casting machine.
He began flashing his lights to get the inspector to pull in to let him past, but he could not do so straight away.
In Hawkinson's work, the human element is the artist as observer, but in Dupont's it is harder to locate, and this seems to be precisely the point: His body has become simply a shape to play with, to pull at here and there, much as one might absentmindedly pull at a lump of clay.