pull strength

pull strength

[′pu̇l ‚streŋkth]
(mechanics)
A unit in tensile testing; the bond strength in pounds per square inch.
References in periodicals archive ?
Specn-Is:4741-1965(Amdt-1,Reafirmed 2003) Except For Pull Strength,Which Should Be 4Kgf(Min).
Increasing core strength and increasing a child's pull strength would improve posture immensely whilst doing reaction games can improve their range of mobility.
IPCHS(TM) substrates passed drop, blister and pull strength (> 15N/sq mm) tests.
The greater the palladium thickness, the narrower the standard deviation on wire pull strength.
A 50% decrease in pull strength was observed: The pull force after reflow was recorded to be 12 N for each individual lead of the QFP versus 6 N after the wave process.
Pull strength is said to be far superior to competing all-plastic belts, allowing the Advantage to operate in heavy duty spiral and turn-curve applications.
In fact, the APFT does not even measure leg strength or pull strength, two potentially critical requirements for Soldiers.
Increased pull strength enables the belt to handle heavy loads of boxes, cases, tubs and totes.
All the bone anchors at each of the relevant pull angles would cause suture failure at the same adequate pull strength, indicating they are all the same and are appropriate in this function.
Shear and pull strength tests show that the solder-bump method of board attachment exhibits performance equal to traditional plastic packages.
The manual hand-cycle lever automatically grips the wire, providing an accurate measurement of the crimp pull strength on a wide range of wire sizes and terminals including crimped, soldered or solderless.
Decreases in bonded area, average shear strength, and pull strength are all indicators that when the bond is made, the area of contact between the bond wire and the pad will be sub-optimal.