pulp


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pulp:

see paperpaper,
thin, flat sheet or tissue made usually from plant fiber but also from rags and other fibrous materials. It is used principally for printing and writing on but has many other applications. The term also includes various types of paperboard, such as cardboard and wallboard.
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The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Pulp

 

a mixture of a finely ground (smaller than 1–0.5 mm) useful mineral and water. It is formed during such processes as the grinding of useful minerals before concentration, hydraulic mining, and hydraulic transport.

The density of pulp (the weight ratio between solid and liquid phases) and the number of particle-size fractions present determine the viscosity, which increases with an increase in density and in the number of particle-size fractions (in micron dimensions). The two factors also determine the sedimentation rate, which decreases with an increase in pulp density and with an increase in the fine particles present.


Pulp

 

the principal mass of the spleen. A distinction is made between red pulp, which consists of reticular tissue whose loops contain mostly red blood cells, and white pulp, which consists of reticular tissue with lymphoid cells.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

pulp

[pəlp]
(anatomy)
A mass of soft spongy tissue in the interior of an organ.
(botany)
The soft succulent portion of a fruit.
(engineering)
(materials)
The cellulosic material produced by reducing wood mechanically or chemically and used in making paper and cellulose products. Also known as wood pulp.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

pulp

1. soft or fleshy plant tissue, such as the succulent part of a fleshy fruit
2. Dentistry the soft innermost part of a tooth, containing nerves and blood vessels
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
During the restoration of carious lesion, different modalities can be used for removal of the lesion that may be partial or complete removal.3 In any case, pulp is protected by some pulp capping material.
"The outlook for fluff pulp pricing is that it will not vary as much as it has in the past and list price will stay high while actual discounted prices slowly drop from 2015 through 2020.
Pellet plants can-suck up much of the waste wood that will be freed by pulp mills.
The virgin pulp lines have a total designed capacity of 710 metric tons/day, and are used mainly for the top and back layer of the board.
Globally, pulp for paper and other uses is taking an increasing share of all wood production, from 40 percent in 1998 to nearly 60 percent over the next 50 years.
Even the adventures in these "adventure" pulps are really about suffering.
A river with a long history of organochlorine and heavy metal pollution (24) enters the Baltic Sea approximately 10 km north of the pulp mill outfall.
And pulp prices, recently depressed by selling by cash-hungry Asian producers, should "correct" by the end of 2002, says Jennifer Corrou, a paper industry analyst with Salomon Smith Barney in New York.
We also learned that several other customers who had been able to achieve good dispersion of dry para-aramid pulp in rubber found better reinforcement when using engineered elastomer to introduce pulp into their compound.
Decades later, with the enormous variety of gay and lesbian fiction at our fingertips, the lesbian pulps look quaint, with their blond femmes in clingy dresses and brunet butches in trousers and men's shirts.