pulpwood


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pulpwood

pine, spruce, or any other soft wood used to make paper
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

pulpwood

[′pəlp‚wu̇d]
(materials)
Any wood that can be reduced to pulp.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
According to BillerudKorsnAaAaAeAns, it has taken measures to minimise t effects of the lack of pulpwood and follows the situation on a daily basis.
PELS of roundwood (CI =0.31, 0.80) and pulpwood (CI = 0.04, 0.22) subcategories appear different, as CIs do not overlap.
EoACA[pounds sterling]This is the first real attempt by a pulpwood producer to measure the difference in carbon conservation of what would have happened in its existing state, what would happen in a pulpwood plantation scenario and what will happen after preservation.EoACA[yen]
Through this scheme, smallholder farmers will be provided access to finance to purchase seeds for pulpwood trees, guidance on growing pulpwood, and an assured market through its guaranteed buy-back programme.
For the purposes of simplifying the model, these numerous exogenous effects were internalized by expressing sawtimber and pulpwood harvest for St.
Patrick's "The Pulpwood Queens' Tiara-Wearing, Book-Sharing Guide to Life," I would be at a loss.
This volume is divided between solid wood and pulpwood using variable proportions that vary by land class, with [[phi].sub.h] the portion going to solid wood and (1 - [[phi.sub.h]) the portion going to pulpwood.
According to the semipublic Japan Overseas Plantation Center for Pulpwood, major traders and paper and pulp makers in Japan started importing wood chips produced in their plantations abroad for the first time last year.
The other tool, below the gauging caliper, is a pair of pulpwood or firewood tongs.
Many markets exist for wood whether in the form of pulpwood for paper or logs for solid wood and panel products.
Production technology, land use patterns, and the relatively high ratio of transport costs to product value (commonly 30 to 40 percent) often lead to market situations in which individual growers of pulpwood have relatively few potential buyers for the product.
Another theme is a helpful, historical discussion of woodlot owners organizing in New Brunswick (NB) and Nova Scotia (NS), and the organizing of province-wide Pulpwood Marketing Boards, successful in NB, and unsuccessful in NS.