pumice stone


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pumice stone

[′pəm·əs ‚stōn]
(geology)

pumice stone

A solid block of pumice; used to polish or rub painted or varnished surfaces.
References in periodicals archive ?
As a clinician working with patients of leprosy for nearly two decades, we have some reservations about the suggestion of the use of a pumice stone, or any other rough surface for the self-care of anaesthetic feet.
Robles Casolco said the use of volcanic ash instead of pumice stone could cut the cost of production of blue jeans in half, which in turn would reduce the cost of the final apparel.
For example, the company's Essence of Beauty line offers a six-tool salon pedicure kit as well as such foot care accessories as a massaging pumice stone.
CalleX, meanwhile, provides people with diabetes with an alternative to using a pumice stone or other device to scrape away calluses.
"The dry nature of ash, mainly pumice stone, acts as an abrasive on all exterior parts of the aircraft, ablating the finished surfaces like sandpaper," he said.
REMOVE unsightly marks on the rim of your toilet by rubbing them with a pumice stone. - Amelia Evans, Welling Kent
Kitchen cleaning pads come in a heavy duty version, as well as ones for stainless steel (and made partially of recycled plastic), enamel (made partially of pumice stone) and anodized aluminum (made partially of walnut shell).
The wooden case most likely would be made of western incense cedar from California, the eraser perhaps a mixture of South American rubber and Italian pumice stone." The aromatic cedar, the eraser, and sometimes the lacquer produce that great fragrance that gathers around a cup of sharpened pencils.
3 Earth Therapeutics Natural Sierra Pumice Stone ($3, earththerapeutics.com)
Elegant Touch's Pumice Stone & Brush, pounds 1.45, is great for removing dead skin cells to leave feet feeling smooth and fresh.
Tape was left on 7 days, followed by removal, soaking in warm water, and rubbing with pumice stone; this was repeated 6 times over 6 weeks.
Hard skin can be treated by soaking feet in warm salty water and rubbing the area gently with a pumice stone. If this doesn't help, see your GP who may refer you to a podiatrist.