punch line


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Acronyms, Wikipedia.

punch line

the culminating part of a joke, funny story, etc., that gives it its humorous or dramatic point
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Even then, the magical pause can strengthen the punch line. When used before the punch line, a pause sets up the anticipation of "here comes the funny stuff!" Anticipation is a form of tension.
The punch line COMFORT N STYLE itself implies comfort to walk n style to flaunt.
And yet the source of Chatkupt's protagonist's inner agony is also a punch line in itself, and a bitter one, given the complexity of our enduring and often unanswered quests--from Googling WikiLeaks to praying to an invisible god--to understand political machinations, cosmic clockwork, or the workings of the divine.
Or is it one of those scenarios where the reader is supposed to suggest a funny caption or punch line?
The vehicle will be sold under the punch line of 'SHIFT_hospitality', and will be based on a newly developed 'D' platform.
After the greatest late-season collapse in the history of baseball, the Metropolitans are a punch line on late-night talk shows.
The punch line, as reported by Loveless and Hess, is that smaller classes and smaller schools "hold promise in certain times and places," but that implementing them at large scale "is likely to prove shortsighted and wasteful." The reasons are rather obvious, if illuminated by the volume's research papers: Smaller classes require more teachers, which makes improving teacher quality a lot tougher; both reforms require retrofitted facilities, a hugely expensive undertaking.
As the holy man panics, he is interrupted by the punch line: 'Smile!
In one test of choosing the correct punch line to a joke, 68% of the 29 alcoholics chose correctly, compared with 92% of the 29 nonalcoholic subjects.
I agree with the punch line "there is no substitute for a long-term savings strategy," and I enjoyed the Micawber's Law example and the line "240 times nothing would equal nothing!"
"You put a little Southern drawl on it and it's George Bush," marvels Jennifer Childs, talking about a possible punch line in 1812 Productions's This Is the Week That Is, running Dec.
There were times throughout the play when I was close to tears and others when I could feel the laughter gurgling in my stomach before a punch line had even been said.