punctuated evolution

punctuated evolution

[¦pəŋk·chə‚wād·əd ‚ev·ə′lü·shən]
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Darwinians have debated how continuous or how punctuated evolution might be.
Some such view seems at least necessary to explain why punctuated evolution suddenly occurs.
In the natural world, punctuated evolution occurs when small groups find them selves geographically isolated and free from natural predators, allowing creatures with rare mutations to thrive and develop into entirely new species.
security doctrine, and it might be naive to expect the Bush administration to understand Pyongyang's punctuated evolution. To do so, however, is not simply of academic interest.
Call it punctuated evolution. A good example would be the change from table rolls to foils back in the 1960s.
Thus, in Stephen Gould's perceptive phrase, "punctuated evolution" rather than revolution seems to be the order of the day (Gould & Eldredge, 1992), in the practice of medicine as in the origins of life.
In 1972 this view was challenged by the American paleontologists Stephen Jay Gould and Niles Eldredge, who suggested what they called punctuated evolution.
We often point out that the change in paper machine technology is "evolution rather than revolution." Although there is some truth to the statement, I prefer to think of it as "punctuated evolution." That is, occasionally something big happens that changes the paper machine in an important way.
For punctuated evolution, the increase is linear, up to an eventual fall-off imposed by the fact that I cannot exceed one ([ILLUSTRATION FOR FIGURE 3A OMITTED]; Rogers [1996] has also simulated this case, with identical results).
Lande (1985, 1986) described how a model of punctuated evolution can be approximately derived by extending the above model of evolution under weak stabilizing selection with random genetic drift to a multipeaked adaptive landscape.
TIPS, Pearson product-moment correlation (= equilibrium approach); FL1G, Felsenstein's independent contrasts assuming gradual evolution (uses actual branch lengths); FLIP, Felsenstein's independent contrasts assuming punctuated evolution (assumes all branch lengths are equal); ME1G, Minimum Evolution contrasts assuming gradual evolution (uses actual branch lengths); ME1P, Minimum Evolution contrasts assuming punctuated evolution (assumes all branch lengths are equal).
Peak shifts have been widely recognized as microevolutionary processes that would generate the macroevolutionary pattern of punctuated evolution (Charlesworth et al.