site

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site

a. the piece of land where something was, is, or is intended to be located
b. (as modifier): site office

Site

1. A contiguous area of land, including a lot or lots or a portion thereof, upon which a project is developed or proposed for development; an area of property that is experiencing land development and management.
2. American group launched by James Wines, and best known for the designs for the Best Products chain of stores, where unique manipulation of architectural elements made the buildings notorious. One of the most unique, but never realized, was the “highrise of houses,” wherein a neighborhood of complete single-story residences were stacked within a steel superstructure. The later works include exhibits for the Expo ’92, Seville, Spain (1992).

Site

 

in genetics, the part of a gene that is capable of independently mutating and recombining. A site is composed of at least one pair of nucleotides; in viruses containing one strand of RNA or DNA, it is composed of at least one nucleotide.


Site

 

in hydraulic engineering, a segment of a river where the structures of a hydroengineering complex are located and where the pressure front is formed by the structures. There are usually two steps involved in the selection of a site. First, a site region is designated in conformity with a general plan for managing the water of the particular river, and then a site axis is determined. The axis is understood as a strip of a certain width that cuts across the river and valley; it may be straight, that is, perpendicular to the banks of the river, curvilinear, or broken. An optimal choice of the site is arrived at by a comparison, from both a technical and economic point of view, of the various alternatives with due regard for climatic, topographical, hydrological, geological, and construction conditions.

site

[sīt]
(computer science)
A position available for the symbols of an inscription, for example, a digital place.
A location on a tally that can bear either a mark or a blank; for example, a location that can be punched or left unpunched on a card.
(engineering)
Position of anything; for example, the position of a gun emplacement.

site

1. An area or plot of ground with defined limits on which a building, project, park, etc., is located or proposed to be located.
2. The specific location of a building or buildings.

site

(1) See website.

(2) A physical location or property.

(3) A Google query operator that hones down the search to a specific website. For example, the query amd site: dell.com searches for "AMD" on only Dell's website.
References in periodicals archive ?
No puncture-related complications were reported, and another fundamental aspect that is not reported in other studies comparing traditional and alternative puncture sites is that no differences in blood glucose were observed.
We also used more than three skin puncture sites when we implanted more than four fiducial markers per patient.
2011 puncture site of saline fluid promotes closure of the dural perforation.
No significant differences in haematoma and puncture site bleeding were found between the six-hour bed rest post-sheath removal group and the eight-hour group; however, a reduction in the perception of pain had been found in the six-hour group at eight and ten hours after the procedure.
Within several weeks of this dose adjustment, he began to complain of increased hemostasis time to 50 minutes per puncture site.
The pressure above the puncture site was kept at a constant time for each subject and among the four devices.
The catheters then are removed and pressure is applied to the puncture site for approximately 15 minutes to stop any bleeding.
Vascular Solutions manufactures, markets and sells the Duett sealing device which combines an easy-to-use balloon catheter delivery mechanism with a biological procoagulant mixture to enable cardiologists and radiologists to rapidly seal the puncture site following catheterization procedures such as angiography, angioplasty and stenting.
We assumed a positive correlation between the finger puncture frequency and RF at the puncture site and a negative correlation between the finger puncture frequency and MRC at the puncture site because repetitive puncturing should produce a semi-permanent reactive hyperemia.
A pseudoaneurysm is defined as a false lumen that occurs at an arterial puncture site and contains active flowing arterial blood.