pundit


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pundit

1. (formerly) a learned person
2. a Brahman learned in Sanskrit and, esp in Hindu religion, philosophy or law

pundit

An expert or knowledgeable person. From "pandit" in Hindi. See guru.
References in periodicals archive ?
When I was a pundit I didn't like the other pundits because I was scared they might be better than me.
UNDER FIRE: | |Manchester United's Antonio Valencia was given a tonguelashing by TV pundit Roy Keane JASON CAIRNDUFF
But some of the TV pundits lacked the courage of their convictions.
Pundit Lab provides exceptional versatility for a pulse velocity test instrument, offering not only the traditional transit time and pulse velocity measurement, but also path length measurement, perpendicular crack depth measurement and surface velocity measurement.
Who's your least favourite personality and any pundit tales?
PUNDITS can keep spouting their opinions - Tony Mowbray isn't interested.
We've seen it again with last night's debate, which most pundits (on TV and in print) scored very or fairly even, with perhaps some recognition that Obama made some small gains because he pretty much held his own on McCain's turf.
Taxes are climbing, energy costs are high, health insurance costs are soaring, and I am getting more greedy than I was as a puppy Pundit.
It's merely content to parody pundit self-aggrandizement.
He will also extend his role as a pundit for the station as well as becoming a regular contributor to Simon Mayo's Sports Panel.
Until then, Coulter was best known as a TV pundit whose stock in trade was tossing her platinum haystack while firing off the sort of conservative bon mots more typically associated with Rush Limbaugh than with leggy blondes.
The term pundit comes from pandita meaning `a learned man.