pundit


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pundit

1. (formerly) a learned person
2. a Brahman learned in Sanskrit and, esp in Hindu religion, philosophy or law

pundit

An expert or knowledgeable person. From "pandit" in Hindi. See guru.
References in periodicals archive ?
The BBC Sport pundit and Match of the Day host was seemingly watching Sky Sports' coverage of the match - for which Mourinho was a pundit - and not long after James had made it 4-0 he aimed a cheeky dig at Mourinho's style of play while United boss.
| RONNY JOHNSEN THE former centre-back has been working as a pundit for Norwegian channel TV2 and also has a role as one of United's ambassadors.
She said: "Every time I'm on with Graeme, I get more comments than when I'm working with another pundit.
Stewart last week claimed Hearts boss Levein had asked BBC bosses to boot him offAT WAR and pundit the air over his repeated critical comments of his old gaffer.
"He is paid to be a pundit now and I think he is fantastic at his job.
Precisely, then, the sort of incident that a pundit is paid to comment on.
CHIEF Minister Mehbooba Mufti has said that the Kashmiri pundits should visit their place of origin, meaning thereby the valley.
Giggs understands both perspectives, having been both a TV pundit and a member of Louis van Gaal's coaching staff at United.
"I was talking with an ex-player who is a pundit now and I was asking him if he wanted to be a manager.
For all I know, amid all the frenzied, fantastic furore following what should have been viewed as the uncontroversial dismissal of Liverpool's Sadio Mane against Manchester City, pundit Jamie Carragher may have told pundit Gary Neville just that.
The 75-times-capped forward was working as a pundit in France and revealed his parking ticket was rising by the day as Wales progressed.
He is a regular pundit on Match of the Day and on the broadcaster's FA Cup coverage.