pure shear

pure shear

[′pyu̇r ′shir]
(mechanics)
A particular example of irrotational strain or flattening in which a body is elongated in one direction and shortened at right angles to it as a consequence of differential displacements on two sets of intersecting planes.
References in periodicals archive ?
Coesfeld, Germany) was modified in order to simultaneously test notched tensile and pure shear mode specimens, the most common specimen geometries for such an analysis.
Fatigue crack propagation testing with the pure shear specimens was used to determine the crack growth behavior of rubber compounds both before and after aging.
The three types of extensional viscosity are uniaxial, biaxial, and pure shear.
As the test setup creates near pure shear stress, the obtained [G.
From the sample biaxiality plot shown below, most of the model is under a pure shear or uniaxial stress.
Pierre et Marie Curie) and Cambon (mechanics, French National Center for Scientific Research) draw upon their significant research in their examples, and consider the needs of the practitioner in their organization, starting with an explanation of the statistical analysis of homogeneous turbulent flows and moving on to incompressible homogeneous isotropic turbulence, including pure rotation (anisotropic) strain, pure shear, buoyancy and stable stratification.
The first process, in which the thickness of workpiece is almost unchanged, is called conventional spinning and the second process where the hoop strain is zero, is named pure shear forming, also named spin forging (Quigley &Monaghan, 2000).
Failure occurred in planes perpendicular to the maximum principal stress planes which are oriented 45 to the pure shear planes (21), (22).
The mode of failure for shear was almost pure shear of the corner block from its place.
A nominal or apparent shear strain is calculated as the ratio of the relative displacement of the points to the initial point separation and is referred to as a nominal value because the strain in this central region of the specimen is not pure shear.
One of the most commonly used geometries for fatigue studies is the "pure shear" specimen for which the value of T is simply the elastic energy density in the pure shear region, W, times the unstrained sample height, [h.
On the other hand, torsion tests produce pure shear stresses (other stresses are extremely small and may realistically be ignored) in the specimen, and the maximum shear stresses in the specimen can be taken as the shear strength of the material (Gupta et al.