pure

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pure

1. of supposedly unmixed racial descent
2. Genetics biology breeding true for one or more characteristics; homozygous
3. Music
a. (of a sound) composed of a single frequency without overtones
b. (of intervals in the system of just intonation) mathematically accurate in respect to the ratio of one frequency to another
References in classic literature ?
That is to say, we will construct, as far as possible, a purely behaviouristic account of truth and falsehood.
It is clear from many instances that accuracy, in other cases, may be purely mechanical.
The proposition that two and two are four follows by purely logical deduction from definitions: that means that its truth results, not from the properties of objects, but from the meanings of symbols.
According to this view, any set of propositions other than the whole of truth can be condemned on purely logical grounds, as internally inconsistent; a single proposition, if it is what we should ordinarily call false, contradicts itself irremediably, while if it is what we should ordinarily call true, it has implications which compel us to admit other propositions, which in turn lead to others, and so on, until we find ourselves committed to the whole of truth.
Yes, Charlotte, I may now speak without injustice, or the fear of being selfish: I have long loved you-- how tenderly, how purely, none can ever know; but could I, with a certainty of my fate before my eyes, with the knowledge that my days were numbered, and that the sun of my life could never reach its meridian, woo you to my love, to make you miserable
The sort of purely poetic tendency in his mind, which made Amiel known in his own lifetime chiefly as a writer of verse, seems to be represented in these volumes by certain passages of natural description, always sincere, and sometimes rising to real distinction.
But something held him back: not so much [31] a reluctancy of temperament, or of physical constitution (common enough cause why men of undeniable gifts fail of commensurate production) but a cause purely intellectual--the presence in him, namely, of a certain vein of opinion; that other, constituent but contending, person, in his complex nature.
I have now enumerated," said Barbicane, "the experiments which I call purely paper ones, and wholly insufficient to establish serious relations with the Queen of the Night.
It is very important to my present object that we should become acquainted with each other -- as the purely accidental result of our being near neighbors.
Industrious, and possessed of a handwriting purely English, his caligraphy is, it must be confessed, even worse than my own.
To the question of what causes historic events another answer presents itself, namely, that the course of human events is predetermined from on high- depends on the coincidence of the wills of all who take part in the events, and that a Napoleon's influence on the course of these events is purely external and fictitious.
I confess, however, that I do not think of him as a patriot and a socialist when I read him; he is then purely a poet, whose gift holds me rapt above the world where I have left my troublesome and wearisome self for the time.