laxative

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Related to purgation: disillusion, purgation therapy

laxative,

drug or other substance used to stimulate the action of the intestines in eliminating waste from the body. The term laxative usually refers to a mild-acting substance; substances of increasingly drastic action are known as cathartics, purgatives, hydrogogues, and drastics, respectively. Laxatives or cathartics fall into three general categories: irritants that stimulate the muscular action of the intestines (cascara, phenolphthalein, senna); compounds that increase the amount of bulk in the intestines either by withdrawing water from the body (salines such as Epsom salts, citrate of magnesia) or by increasing the bulk when combined with fluids (agar-agar, bran, the various cellulose substances); and lubricants such as mineral oil, which ease the passage of waste and counteract excessive drying of the intestinal contents. Frequent or regular use of cathartics may seriously disrupt the natural digestive processes. When food and even waste products are forced out of the intestinal tract too rapidly, the body is deprived of vital substances, including the nutrients absorbed in the small intestine and the water, vitamins, and minerals extracted from the waste matter in the large intestine. Vitamins A and D, which are soluble in oil, are removed from the body even when the least irritating laxative, mineral oil, is taken. In addition to disrupting digestive and nutritional processes, laxatives reinforce the condition they are intended to overcome. When the intestines are purged, it may be several days before they can fill again with sufficient waste to induce natural elimination. The harm can be perpetuated by frequent use aimed at forcing daily elimination. The response to laxatives is soon lessened, so that larger and more frequent doses may become necessary. Laxatives should be avoided especially when there is abdominal pain. An inflamed appendix may rupture after the use of a laxative. See constipationconstipation,
infrequent or difficult passage of feces. Constipation may be caused by the lack of adequate roughage or fluid in the diet, prolonged physical inactivity, certain drugs, or emotional disturbance.
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laxative

[′lak·səd·iv]
(pharmacology)
An agent that stimulates bowel movement and relieves constipation.

laxative

an agent stimulating evacuation of faeces
References in periodicals archive ?
Purgation is the central motif of the final verses, drawn from the Eucharistic prayer (v.
Lyons distinguishes between catharsis and purgation, further stipulating that pity and fear may be the means rather than the end of purgation, in his chapter "Passion in the Age of Reason" in Kingdom of Disorder (50).
Thus, from highest to lowest angels are ranked according to union, illumination, and purgation.
looking at past performance) and prescribe remedies remarkably similar to those of their medieval counterparts: purgation or bloodletting (firing managers and making shifts in asset allocation).
My own run-in with these nationalists -without-a-nation occurred in the very pages of Taki's Magazine, where Derbyshire's offending (and offensive) piece was published, and led in short order to his purgation from NR.
She takes a dim view of the current state of public discourse in the United States, a Hobbesian "war of each against all" characterized by cynicism, paranoia, tribalism, rancor, and "rationalist purgation.
It starts with Guarini's theoretical pronouncements on the nascent genre of 'tragicomedy': that its 'end' is moral and should be understood as the purgation of melancholy.
Moreira traces the evolution of postmortem purgation in preparation for heavenly bliss.
Corbett (2009) suggests purgation > illumination > union, while Artress (2000:9) proposes releasing, receiving, and returning as appropriate labels.
In the purgation of that orgasmic catharsis she came to terms with the repressed memory of that fowl bleeding.
This contemporary integration of the corporate character of hope and emerging ecumenical consensus did not, however, resolve the inherited division and condemnations inherited from the sixteenth-century polarization over individual hope, purgation, and our relationships to those who have gone before.
This year's winner is Katherine Hill, for her funny, beautiful, and haunting story of grief, purgation, and conflagration, "Waste Management," selected by final judge Andrea Barrett.