laxative

(redirected from purgation)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Wikipedia.
Related to purgation: disillusion, purgation therapy

laxative,

drug or other substance used to stimulate the action of the intestines in eliminating waste from the body. The term laxative usually refers to a mild-acting substance; substances of increasingly drastic action are known as cathartics, purgatives, hydrogogues, and drastics, respectively. Laxatives or cathartics fall into three general categories: irritants that stimulate the muscular action of the intestines (cascara, phenolphthalein, senna); compounds that increase the amount of bulk in the intestines either by withdrawing water from the body (salines such as Epsom salts, citrate of magnesia) or by increasing the bulk when combined with fluids (agar-agar, bran, the various cellulose substances); and lubricants such as mineral oil, which ease the passage of waste and counteract excessive drying of the intestinal contents. Frequent or regular use of cathartics may seriously disrupt the natural digestive processes. When food and even waste products are forced out of the intestinal tract too rapidly, the body is deprived of vital substances, including the nutrients absorbed in the small intestine and the water, vitamins, and minerals extracted from the waste matter in the large intestine. Vitamins A and D, which are soluble in oil, are removed from the body even when the least irritating laxative, mineral oil, is taken. In addition to disrupting digestive and nutritional processes, laxatives reinforce the condition they are intended to overcome. When the intestines are purged, it may be several days before they can fill again with sufficient waste to induce natural elimination. The harm can be perpetuated by frequent use aimed at forcing daily elimination. The response to laxatives is soon lessened, so that larger and more frequent doses may become necessary. Laxatives should be avoided especially when there is abdominal pain. An inflamed appendix may rupture after the use of a laxative. See constipationconstipation,
infrequent or difficult passage of feces. Constipation may be caused by the lack of adequate roughage or fluid in the diet, prolonged physical inactivity, certain drugs, or emotional disturbance.
..... Click the link for more information.
.

laxative

[′lak·səd·iv]
(pharmacology)
An agent that stimulates bowel movement and relieves constipation.

laxative

an agent stimulating evacuation of faeces
References in periodicals archive ?
Bromley, "Rimming," 179, 172; Will Stockton, Playing Dirty: Sexuality and Waste in Early Modern Comedy (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2011), xix; Ben Saunders, "Iago's Clyster: Purgation, Anality, and the Civilizing Process," Shakespeare Quarterly 55, no.
A powerful vehicle for the purgation of piteous horror might be seen in the second modulation of the metaphor of the Inferno: the nun's life as a journey from innocence to corruption, and likely damnation, which is an inversion of Dante's journey from despair to sure knowledge of redemption.
At its core, the universe is a liturgical structure of greater and lesser creatures--angels, men, animals, plants, and minerals--constituted as a hierarchy that participates in and reflects the goodness of God, and represents and mediates the life of grace according to the three modes as stated by Aquinas, which are the stages of spiritual perfection in Catholic tradition, from the highest to the lowest: union (remotion or perfection, the divesting of all created things and relying solely on God himself), illumination (highest positive knowledge of God), and purgation (election and ordering to the spiritual--God as cause of all).
To take just a few examples: the scrapping of the six grade of the Basic Education and its recent reinstatement, the sham purgation of syllabi, only by cutting textbooks short, irrespective of contents, and lately, the cancellation of the Basic Education Completion Certificate.
This sin, according to the indigenous people, could be redeemed through the rituals of transformation and purgation that can only take place in the desert.
The theology and piety of the later Middle Ages treated intercession for the dead, postmortem purgation and the place called Purgatory as inseparable elements of Christian death ritual.
Despite Lina's reflective mysticism, she does also exhibit the conventional stages of mystical union with God reminiscent of traditional Catholicism: purification or purgation, illumination, and union.
Katharsis (Greek) is defined as purgation or purification (Oxford English Dictionary) and refers to the Greek chorus that employed music, dance, poetry, and song to purify the soul.
The more we identify with the hero, the more thorough our sense of purgation and catharsis.
She takes a dim view of the current state of public discourse in the United States, a Hobbesian "war of each against all" characterized by cynicism, paranoia, tribalism, rancor, and "rationalist purgation.
Moreira traces the evolution of postmortem purgation in preparation for heavenly bliss.
But it is transformed by mystical ideas about the spiral stairs which the dead must descend, their need before they are born again to undergo punishment and purgation, and the cycles of astrological transformation in the course of the Great Year.