purgatory

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purgatory

(pûrg`ətôr'ē) [Lat.,=place of purging], in the teaching of the Roman Catholic Church, the state after death in which the soul destined for heaven is purified. Since only the perfect can enjoy the vision of God (inferred from Mat. 12.36; Rev. 21.17), and some die in grace who have still unpunished or unrepented minor sins on their conscience, they must be purged of such sins. Those who have suffered already (especially the martyrs) may have undergone much or all of their punishment. Souls in purgatory are members of the church along with the living and the blessed in heaven and may be helped, as in life, by the prayers and works of their fellow members. This unity is the communion of saints. Prayers for the dead are therefore commonplace in Roman Catholic life; one form is the requiemrequiem
[Lat.,=rest], proper Mass for the souls of the dead, performed on All Souls' Day and at funerals. The reformation of Roman Catholic liturgy following the Second Vatican Council (see Vatican Council, Second) has modified the traditional requiem, and it is now called the
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 Mass (see also indulgenceindulgence,
in the Roman Catholic Church, the pardon of temporal punishment due for sin. It is to be distinguished from absolution and the forgiveness of guilt. The church grants indulgences out of the Treasury of Merit won for the church by Christ and the saints.
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). The duration of time and the nature of the state of purgatory are not defined; the suffering is different in kind from that of hellhell,
in Western monotheistic religions, eternal abode of souls damned by the judgment of God. The souls in hell are deprived forever of the sight of God. The punishment of hell is generally analogized to earthly fire.
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, for the soul in purgatory knows that his punishment is temporary. The ancient Jews prayed for the dead (2 Mac. 12.43–46), and the Christians continued the practice, holding the concomitant belief in a middle state between life and heaven. The Eastern Orthodox Church maintains this position without adopting the Western terms developed in the Middle Ages. Protestants have generally abandoned it.
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Purgatory, in accordance with Catholic teaching, is a temporary place or condition of punishment for those who, upon death, are not entirely free from venial sin. Fortean Picture Library.

Purgatory

(religion, spiritualism, and occult)

The Roman Catholic doctrine of purgatory (from the Latin word purgare, meaning "to make clean or purify") affirms that there is "a place or condition of temporal punishment for those who, departing this life in God's grace, are not entirely free from venial faults, or have not fully paid the satisfaction due to their transgressions."

"Venial faults" are those sins of human frailty that are not as serious as the more damning sins, such as murder, but still serve to render the person less than pure before God. Unrepented venial faults still need to be dealt with. That is the purpose of purgatory.

Purgatory exists as a way-station on the path to heaven. Prayers of the faithful on Earth help lessen the time spent there, and indulgences, or forgiveness, can still be granted by the pope. But the doctrine points out the Catholic view of the seriousness of sin and the purity of God. Even though sin is atoned for by Christ, the results of that sin carry over into actions and attitudes, and these must be dealt with.

The official Church doctrine lists page after page of arguments from the Bible and tradition, but points out that the sixteenth-century Protestant reformers decided that purgatory did not exist. It was a figment of Catholic imagination. As such, it is a doctrine unique to Catholicism.

Purgatory

 

according to Catholic dogma, a place where the souls of dead sinners can be cleansed of sins committed in life. The cleansing is supposedly accomplished through the sinner’s enduring various trials; it is also accomplished through the prayers and good works of the relatives of the deceased, primarily through their monetary contributions to the church. The doctrine of purgatory was adopted by the Council of Florence (1438–45) and was confirmed in 1562 by the Council of Trent.

purgatory

Chiefly RC Church a state or place in which the souls of those who have died in a state of grace are believed to undergo a limited amount of suffering to expiate their venial sins and become purified of the remaining effects of mortal sin
References in periodicals archive ?
They signify the artistic, sexual, and political liberty that is lacking in her own purgatorial state plagued by the guilt brought on by constant CDR (Comites de Defensa de la Revolucion) surveillance, state discourse, and the aftereffects of her marriage to el Traidor--all situations that she must overcome.
As Susan Srigley has argued, the conversation with God and moment of revelation are a purgatorial experience that produces both an enlightenment about "the measure of her soul" and a movement into "the true ordering of love" (143).
Thus, when signifying "moments of eternal choice, of temptation, fail, and redemption," oceans mirror Biblical imagery of moving water as "a cleansing, transforming force"; for the sea also can be "the setting for purgatorial suffering, and the ocean voyage must be undertaken 'as a pain which must be accepted as a cure, the death that leads to rebirth'" (350-51).
These dysfunctional loves, however, are redeemed, we shall see, through purgatorial suffering, sacramental relationships, several orders and examples of natural gift-love, and, finally, by supernatural gift-love, however briefly felt and glimpsed.
19) Sarah Sturm-Maddox points to the resonance of the petrose in Purgatory in her article "The Rime Petrose and the Purgatorial Palinode.
A Purgatorial Flame: Seven British Writers in the Second World War.
Second place in the SPL is still up for grabs but Pittodrie has been plunged into a purgatorial paralysis by last week's Scottish Cup exit.
Yes, being an MP is an intense job which often involves engagements seven days a week; yes, the majority of the work is thoroughly unglamorous; and yes, the journey between a constituency and Westminster is often a purgatorial commute.
Here, to paraphrase Virgil's declaration to Dante as they complete the moral curriculum of the purgatorial terraces and prepare to enter the terrestrial paradise, there are no narrow paths, there is no art: "fuor se' de l'erte vie, fuor se' de l'arte" (Purg.
After eighty years of silence, of seeming purgatorial peace, Geordie's nights are ablaze in the same nightmares that he had experienced just after the war.
As Wellvang careened through this purgatorial landscape, the noises of the crash returned, amplified tenfold, became explosions, whistling incomings, detonating mortars.
Thus began my purgatorial routine of waking up each day at the local Holiday Inn Express with bed-rattling chills and a fever pushing north of 104 degrees, lurking outside the hotel lobby waiting for a cab while wearing sunglasses to hide the rash that had spread to my left eye, getting blood taken, hearing a nauseating series of uncertainties from doctors and then heading back to the hotel to order dinner from California Pizza Kitchen or Red Robin.