Purism

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purism

insistence on traditional canons of correctness of form or purity of style or content, esp in language, art, or music
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Purism

 

a movement in French painting in the second and third decades of the 20th century. The founders and chief proponents of purism were A. Ozenfant and C. E. Jeanneret (Le Corbusier). The purists protested against what they considered to be the merely decorative tendencies of cubism, which was marked by deliberate distortion. They sought to clearly render “stable” objective forms and to represent “primary” elements, which could be apprehended with minimum effort. Purist works were marked by emphatic two-dimensionality and the flowing rhythm of semitransparent silhouettes and outlines of objects (intentionally of one type—carafes, tumblers, and similar items). Purism failed to develop in painting, but, after undergoing a substantial number of theoretical revisions, found application in modern architecture, particularly in the designs of Le Corbusier.

REFERENCES

Modernizm (collection of articles). Moscow, 1973.
Jeanneret, C. E., and A. Ozenfant. Après le cubisme. Paris, 1918.

Purism

 

efforts to purify a literary language of foreign borrowings and neologisms and to prevent its penetration by non-normative lexical and grammatical elements, including colloquialisms, popular speech, and dialectisms.

Purism is characteristic of a period in which the norms of a national literary language are becoming established and its stylistic system is changing. Such periods, marked by an influx of new lexical elements and their stylistic redistribution, are generally associated with political and cultural movements; this has been the case in Hungary, Czechoslovakia, Turkey, India, and elsewhere. Purists have sometimes insisted that if a national language is to be distinctive, it must be completely purged of even essential borrowings: that is, words of foreign origin already part of the language must be replaced by native words or by neologisms composed from native morphemes.

In Russian democratic literary criticism of the 19th century, represented by such writers as V. G. Belinskii, the term “purism” denoted a formal, conservative attitude toward language; the chief proponents of this view were A. S. Shishkov, F. V. Bul-garin, N. I. Grech, and M. P. Pogodin.

REFERENCES

Vinokur, G. O. “O purizme.” In his book O kul’ture iazyka, 2nd ed.
Moscow, 1929. Vinokur, G. O. Russkii iazyk. Moscow, 1945.

T. V. VENTTSEL

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
During the intermediate puristic period efforts were made to redirect the usage back to the spatial meaning.
Throughout, the publication reflects Cherix's attempt to dislodge Conceptual art from its pentecostal pedestal--to shake up what Art & Language once called the "puristic stylistic fetishism" that "sanitizes the memory of Conceptual Art and denies the dialectical complexity of human cultural experience, neglecting that many Conceptual artists assumed an adolescent posture in the form of an ironical spectacle that eventually evolved into a more conspicuous life." Accordingly, within Cherix's frame of reference, Conceptual art is a hybrid suffused by praxes such as Cobra, Situationism, Fluxus, Happenings, Utopian social experiments, the Living Theatre, Otto Muehl's AAO commune, and Hollywood.
The barrel is elegantly shaped in a single piece that emphasizes its puristic lines and ensures a high degree of functionalism.
Warm earthy tones combined with puristic elements dominate the interior design.
against her own puristic, legalistic emphasis on strict legal relevance'.
The private associations, for example, display all four elements and resemble the puristic discourses of previous eras, particularly that of the Baroque era.
from a kind of puristic narrativity through the comprehensive world of artificial sound influenced by hermeneutics to interactive systems that as it were suspend time and enable the listener/viewer to "step inside".
In the national languages which were exposed to strong foreign influence during certain periods of their history, the specific historical-political situation gave rise to puristic reactions, aimed at preserving the linguistic identity and recognizability as a form of national identity.
Even though a Sufi master himself, he appears to have become puristic in this second stage of his life, and he was the inspiration for the formation of the salafi Deobandh school (his son's students were among its founders).
The reluctance of the Paris school to use anything concerning the imperial period that is not from Tun-huang has engendered a puristic attitude towards the studies that tends to impose limited confines on research.
Of course, these puristic procedures have a long tradition in German lands.