purpurin


Also found in: Dictionary, Medical, Wikipedia.

purpurin

[′pər·pyə·rən]
(organic chemistry)
C14H8O5 A compound crystallizing as long orange needles from dilute alcohol solutions; used in the manufacture of dyes, and as a reagent for the detection of boron. Also known as natural red.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Supply of drugs (the sum of sodium salts of chlorin e6, chlorine p6, purpurin) Document Purchase Start date : 08 Jul 2019
Dey et al., "Synthesis, crystal structure, DNA interaction and in vitro anticancer activity of a Cu(ii) complex of purpurin: Dual poison for human DNA topoisomerase i and II," RSC Advances, vol.
Although purpurin has been used for centuries in textile production to make vivid red, orange and pink dyes, the researchers have found that it can also be used as the basis for a sustainable and eco-friendly alternative to conventional lithium-ion batteries.
"Purpurin," on the other hand, said team member and City College Professor of Chemistry George John, "comes from nature and it will go back to nature."
/ That some did not goes without saying." The description of the elements of this perfume goes beyond its elements to their etymological roots just as the couple moves "from the scent to the Afghan rug" where they "began to enter its arabesques of indigo / and purpurin flecked with yellow larkspur of the desert." As they enter it the pattern changes from "a Tree of life" to "a dragon and phoenix in combat" to "a snarl of vines or snakes." The end up "plung[ing] down through the ages till we lanled on a field / of Afghan war rug bright with helicopters,, guns and tanks." As time and place change, the couple venture further afield to where the tree of life can hold unknown dangers and the double nature of memory, both its pleasure and its pain become tangible.
Liquiritigenin Antioxidant, age spot Psoralea corylifolia Psoralen, Bavachinin Anti-inflammatory Rumex maritimus Rumarin, Chrysophanic acid Skin whitening Rubia cardifolia Purpurin, Munjistin Anti-inflammatory Terminalia arjuna Arjunic acid Antioxidant Terminalia chebula Chebulagic, Chebulinic acid Antioxidant Tinospora cordifolia Tinosporine, Tinosporide Anti-inflammatory Tamarix gallica Tamarixin Future of Ayurvedic-based Ingredients
Scientists at Louisiana State University have demonstrated the in-vitro inhibitory activity of the Bowman-Birk inhibitor from soybean and rice, ellagic acid from grapes, black bean tannins, thymoquinone from black seeds, purpurin, and phytic from cereals and legumes against angiogenesis stimulators such as the matrix metalloproteinase-1, -2, and -9, and cancer cell proliferation.