suture

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suture

1. Surgery
a. catgut, silk thread, or wire used to stitch together two bodily surfaces
b. the surgical seam formed after joining two surfaces
2. Anatomy a type of immovable joint, esp between the bones of the skull (cranial suture)
3. Zoology a line of junction in a mollusc shell, esp the line between adjacent chambers of a nautiloid shell
4. Botany a line marking the point of dehiscence in a seed pod or capsule

Suture

 

the surgical uniting, chiefly by a surgical needle and suture material, of tissues cut during surgery or separated by an injury. Threads made of silk, linen, or Dacron and other polymeric materials are used in superficial sutures. In buried sutures, which are applied to internal organs and tissues, absorbable materials, such as catgut or biologically inert polymeric threads, are used; buried sutures are not removed.

One type of superficial suture, cosmetic suture, which is applied to the face, is made using threads of horsehair or thin ca-pron. Osteorrhaphy (osteosynthesis) is a type of buried suture. Primary, primo-secondary, and secondary sutures are distinguished on the basis of when the sutures are applied, which depends on the type of wound. The sutureless union of tissues is achieved with various adhesives made from polymeric materials (for example, cyanoacrylate) or with metal clamps.

suture

[′sü·chər]
(biology)
A distinguishable line of union between two closely united parts.
(medicine)
A fine thread used to close a wound or surgical incision.
References in periodicals archive ?
The ring-pull at the tail of endoloop is larger than others, so it could be conveniently connected and removed the endoloop with the delivery system during the purse-string suture. This study reported that TSR and CSR, with the improved purse-string suture technique using single-channel endoscope, were 94% and 100%, respectively, the mean closure time was 18 [+ or -] 5 min, and all wounds were healed in 3 months after the procedure.
Sanada, "Laparoscopy-assisted esophagoenteral anastomosis using endoscopic purse-string suture instrument "Endo-PSI (II)" and circular stapler," Gastric Cancer: Official Journal of the International Gastric Cancer Association and the Japanese Gastric Cancer Association, vol.
Stegmayr, "Paramedian insertion of Tenckhoff catheters with three purse-string sutures reduces the risk of leakage," Peritoneal Dialysis International, vol.
This manoeuvre however would not have helped in our patient, as it was the PAC sheath that was caught in the caval purse-string suture. As far as we are aware, this complication has not been reported before.
He urged caution in adopting the new procedure, which has "several pitfalls." Misapplication of the purse-string suture can result in a full-thickness resection of the rectal wall and subsequent rectovaginal or anovaginal fistula.
There is a variation of this procedure: Perform a separate anterior and posterior colporrhaphy, with two purse-string sutures used to approximate the anterior and posterior segments, thus obliterating any dead space.
Suture the edges of the pubocervical fascia and the rectovaginal septum with a purse-string suture using 0-sized Vicryl or Dexon absorbable suture.
Placement of an absorbable purse-string suture for sheath interruption during the NSV procedure is described.
Khanna et al.16 described that a purse-string suture reinforced with Teflon pledgets through the aortic wall above the proximal suture line can prevent bleeding.
* simple closure of the peritoneum with a purse-string suture (n = 34), with none of the uterosacral-cardinal ligaments incorporated into the repair.
To incorporate a McCall's culdoplasty/vault suspension to ensure support prophylactically or therapeutically, shorten the uterosacral ligaments using a permanent purse-string suture of each of the uterosacral ligaments.
The purse-string suture is drawn tight, bringing redundant rectal mucosa and some hemorrhoidal tissue into the stapler head.